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Archive for August, 2014


Kiko’s Food News, 8.29.14

Grandma, if you’re reading this, don’t give up your cottage cheese just yet: doctors know that people who eat too much salt should eat less of it, but may be guilty of running too far and too fast in the other direction given that Americans’ average consumption of 3.4 grams of sodium per day is on the low end of the “safe zone”: (New York Times)

It’s worth thinking about why people of lesser means may struggle to maintain a healthy weight, whether it’s due to the challenge of exercising in an unsafe neighborhood or emotional eating that can stem from the stress of making ends meet: (The Atlantic)

In Russian Food News, Putin’s government closed four McDonalds’ in Moscow last week, including one that is in some years the busiest McDonald’s in the world; the reason given by the country’s consumer protection agency was “numerous violations of the sanitary code”, but “Beeg Mak” lovers there know better: (New York Times)

Mexican authorities are restricting food marketing to children on television and in movie theaters, part of an attack plan against staggering obesity rates there; the restrictions follow recent taxes on sugary beverages and calorie-dense snacks: (Wall Street Journal)

Uber is trying its hand in the fast-food delivery industry with its new service “UberFRESH”, which it claims will deliver meals from local restaurants in under 10 minutes: (Forbes)


Kiko’s Food News, 8.22.14

Given the over $1 billion of food the US exported to Russia last year, Putin’s ban on American food imports is going to hit our poultry, pork and nut industries hard; food makers, however, claim they’ll be able to redistribute production to other global markets: (Washington Post)

The next international exposition, 2015 Expo Milan, will gather 140 countries to tackle the question of how to feed a future of 9 billion people without destroying the planet; America’s presence will focus on topics like GMOs and our obesity epidemic, fueled by national faves like lobster rolls and po’ boys: (Washington Post)

French scientists seem to have figured out how to make raw milk cheese safe, so cheesemakers at England’s legendary Neal’s Yard Dairy want to translate a French government cheese manual to unlock the secrets of how to use good bacteria to battle the bad: (NPR)

Whether it’s San Francisco’s Valencia or D.C.’s 14th NW, many urban streets beloved for independent business are losing ground to chain stores that all feel the same; somehow though, the “sleek epicurean village” one entrepreneur is hatching in Paris feels especially dramatic: (New York Times)


Rose

Changing the World With Cabot Vintage

Cabot1Greetings, friends, and welcome to another installment of our cheese news! I’m happy and proud to write to you about a cornerstone cheese that we carry at Bi-Rite, one that is righteous and beautiful in both flavor and backstory, creating change and changing taste buds. 

Cabot Cooperative has been dairy farmer-owned since 1919, establishing itself as a source for sustainable and responsibly-produced dairy products. Currently numbering more than 1,200 family farms, the Cooperative has ensured the survival and growth of many small dairies, during a time when commodity cheesemakers have made it very difficult for most to do so. On top of this, Cabot Cooperative is  a Certified B Corp; the idea behind B Corps is to encourage businesses that focus on more than profit margins, and that give back to their communities and industries in very real, tangible ways. This can be seen in the many jobs that Cabot provides, but also by the fact that such a large organization continues to create such delicious, sustainable, well-made products. This is exactly the type of business that Bi-Rite loves to be working with; one that cares very deeply about the process, the producers, and the community that the product reaches.

My focus today is a very special cheese, one that I am sure you have seen around the market, one that has most likely caught your eye with its captivating form and proud signage: Cabot Vintage Cheddar.

Cabot2Cabot Vintage is aged for a minimum of two years, revealing beautifully buttery round notes that punctuate with a salty sharp bite.  Surrounded by decadent purple wax, (which draws comparison to Elizabeth Taylor’s eyes and royal Roman garb), it is both delicious and beautiful to behold. Our Kitchen and Deli at Bi-Rite Market on 18th Street use it in a variety of dishes, the current crown jewel being the Slow-Roasted 5 Dot Ranch Beef and Cheddar Sandwich (a staff favorite for sure). We find it pairs expertly with apples and mustards, the tangy sweetness complimenting both textures and flavors. It melts like a dream, but also is a frequent guest favorite due to its delightful snackability. When you combine all of these factors with its very Bi-Rite-esque background, you come up with the cheese of the season, one that will fit easily in your backpack as you hike the trails, snuggly in your picnic basket as you picnic on the windswept beaches, or sweetly in your hand as you soak up the crisp fall sun at Dolores Park.

The cheese stands alone, my friends, spreading the good word of the Cabot Cooperative and the B Corps organization. We are pleased to carry Cabot Vintage as one of our many stellar cheeses, and hope to see you in the Market soon asking for a taste. You will not be disappointed.

Curds and whey,

Rose

 

 


Kiko’s Food News, 8.7.14

A study showed that type 2 diabetes is more common in people who work shifts, likely because of the altered sleeping and eating patterns that shift work requires; eating late at night also makes one more likely to store calories as fat, leading to an increase risk of obesity: (Forbes)

The American Society of Nutrition’s Position Paper on Processed Foods has elicited discussion over the high percentage of nutrients in the average diet that come from processed foods, as well as what even qualifies a food as “processed”: (Huffington Post)

If you’ve ordered “eight olives in a ramekin”, or “an unconventional riff on brussels sprouts”, at a restaurant lately, you might be frequenting the typical trendy restaurants of our day: (Eater)

This author wants an end to the artisanal food that’s creeping into the ballpark, seeing no reason that a stadium experience should try to mimic a fine dining one: (USA Today)

Does anyone actually choose to eat honeydew? People rarely buy it for themselves, but often serve it to others (who most likely pick around it for the canteloupe and watermelon): (New York Times)

So, if you’re as enamored by melons’ summer sweetness as I am, how do you pick the best ones? Tips from one of my favorite bloggers include choosing watermelons with scars, and honeydews with rough tracks: (Chinese Grandma)