Bi-Rite Blog


 
Renee Frojo

Bi-Rite Guest Recipe Contributor Renee Frojo’s Strawberry Rhubarb Galette

Strawberry, Pecan and Goat Cheese Galette with Rhubarb Compote

Sweet strawberries and tart rhubarb are a classic spring recipe combo, but the addition of creamy goat cheese and a toasted pecan crust adds a little bit of savory to mix things up.

This recipe calls for using both cooked and fresh strawberries, which are at their sweetest during peak season. Roasted strawberries make the tart nice and jammy, while the fresh strawberries and mint brighten the whole thing up.

Servings: 10
Prep Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Cook Time: 45 Minutes

Ingredients:

For the dough

½ cup pecans

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

3 teaspoons light brown sugar

½ teaspoon kosher salt

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

½ cup (1 stick) chilled unsalted butter, diced

 

For the filling

1 cup chopped rhubarb

¼ cup honey

1 pound strawberries, hulled and sliced into quarters

¼ cup sugar, plus more for sprinkling

¼ cup goat cheese, crumbled

2 tablespoons heavy cream

2 tablespoons mint leaves

 

Instructions:

  1. First, start by making the dough. Heat the oven to 350°F. On a baking sheet, toast the pecans until fragrant and slightly darkened, 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer to a food processor and pulse until coarsely ground. Add flour, sugar, salt, and cinnamon and pulse just to combine. Add butter and pulse until mixture resembles coarse meal.
  2. Transfer mixture to a large bowl and drizzle with 4 tablespoons ice water. Mix, adding another tablespoonful of water if needed, until the mixture just starts coming together in a dough. Pat dough into a 6″-diameter disk and wrap in plastic. Transfer to the refrigerator and chill at least 1 hour.
  3. While the dough rests, make the rhubarb compote. In a medium pot over medium-high heat, warm the rhubarb, honey and 1 cup of water until boiling. Cook, stirring halfway, until the rhubarb completely breaks down and the liquid is reduced to ¼ cup, 15 to 20 minutes. Let cool.
  4. In a large bowl, toss the strawberries with the sugar and let sit 10 minutes.
  5. Heat the oven to 375°F. Roll out dough on a lightly floured surface to a 12″ round and then carefully transfer to a parchment-lined baking sheet.
  6. Spread the rhubarb compote out in center of dough, leaving a 2-inch border. Add half of the strawberries and the goat cheese. Fold over the edges, overlapping slightly. Brush the dough with heavy cream and sprinkle with sugar.
  7. Transfer to the oven. Bake galette until the crust is dark golden brown and filling is bubbling, 45 to 50 minutes.
  8. Remove from oven and let cool slightly. Top with remaining fresh strawberries and garnish with mint. Serve on its own or with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.


 
Renee Frojo

Bi-Rite Guest Recipe Contributor Renee Frojo’s Spring Pizza

Fava Bean, Broccoli Rabe and Burrata Pizza with Pea Shoot Pesto

The best way to use up spring produce might just be to throw on it on a pizza.

For this recipe, buttery fava beans and bitter broccoli rabe are paired with creamy burrata cheese and a zesty pea shoot pesto. Half the toppings are cooked, while the other half are thrown on fresh, giving this pizza the best of both worlds.

Servings: 2 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 15 Minutes

Ingredients:

For the pesto

1 cup pea shoots
½ cup parsley
½ teaspoon salt
2 garlic cloves, sliced
½ cup pecorino cheese, grated
¼ cup pine nuts
1 teaspoon lemon juice
½ olive oil

For the pizza

1 cups shelled fava beans
Kosher salt
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 pound Bi-Rite pizza dough
Flour, for dusting
1 small bunch broccoli rabe
8 ounces burrata
4 ounces watercress
1 teaspoon Za’atar

Instructions:

First, make the pesto. In a food processor, blend the pea shoots, parsley, salt, garlic cloves, pecorino, pine nuts and lemon juice. As you blend, slowly add the olive oil into the mixture until smooth.

Next, cook the fava beans. In a medium saucepan, heat 3 cups water until boiling. Add fava beans and cook until tender, about 4 minutes. Drain and transfer to a bowl of cold water. Once cool enough to handle, peel the shells from the fava beans.

In a medium bowl, combine the fava beans with the lemon juice, 1 tablespoon oil, and a sprinkle of salt. Set aside.

Heat the oven to 450°F.  Lightly flour a counter or cooking surface. Using your hands or a rolling pin, roll the dough out to a flattened disk. Place the dough on a greased baking sheet or baking sheet covered with parchment paper and then use your hands to pull the pizza dough into an oval shape.

Spoon a couple tablespoons of the pesto over the dough. Bake until the crust starts to brown, 8 to 10 minutes. Meanwhile, toss the broccoli rabe in the remaining oil and season with salt. Remove the pizza from the oven, spread half the burrata on top with the broccoli rabe. Place back in the oven until the broccoli rabe is cooked, 5 to 6 minutes. Remove from the oven, add the remaining burrata, fava beans, watercress and za’atar. Sprinkle with salt.



 
Renee Frojo

Bi-Rite Guest Recipe Contributor Renee Frojo’s Spring Salmon Bowl

Spring grain bowl with salmon and green garlic dill dressing

There’s very little that needs to be done to spring produce when eaten at peak season.

For this grain bowl recipe, crunchy English peas, raw asparagus and spicy wasabi greens are tossed in a bright, citrus dressing that gets a little nutiness from a dash of tahini and and freshness from seasonal dill. Red quinoa and salmon round it out to make a complete meal.

Serves: 1 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 0 Minutes
Ingredients:

1 bulb green garlic, minced
1 tablespoon dill, chopped (plus more for garnish)
1 anchovy fillet, minced
2 tablespoons lemon juice
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon tahini
1 tablespoon heavy cream
½ teaspoon Kosher salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup cooked red quinoa
2 ounce cooked salmon, chopped
2 stalks asparagus, shaved
½ cup wasabi arugula
½ cup microgreens
¼ cup English peas
1 radish, thinly sliced
1 beet, thinly sliced
2 teaspoons sunflower seeds

Instructions:

  1. In a small bowl, whisk together the green garlic, dill, lemon juice, olive oil, tahini, salt and pepper until combined.
  2. In a serving bowl, toss the remaining ingredients together. Drizzle with the dressing, season with more salt, to taste, and serve.

Stay in touch with Renee by visiting her blog laurelstreetkitchen.com



 
Trac

A Local Nouveau from Poe

The tradition of making “Nouveau” wines in France has been around for decades, with Beaujolais Nouveau morphing into a yearly celebration in Paris and Beaujolais. Traditionally, the term “nouveau” simply refers to the practice of bottling the first wine of the harvest just a few weeks after fermentation to celebrate and signal the end of harvest. The wine is always released on the 3rd Thursday of the November.

The last couple of years, we have been seeing more and more U.S. wineries joining in the tradition. Bow & Arrow in Oregon, Scribe in Sonoma, and Broc Cellars in Berkeley. However, we consider Samantha “Sam” Sheehan, winemaker of Poe Wines (and Bi-Rite Chardonnay and Pinot Noir), to be the one that started the current trend in the US. She started making the Nouveau wines 4 years ago, basically to just throw a party like the French. But the wine was so good and popular that she kept making it. Her Nouveau, made from Pinot Noir, is fresh and intensely floral with aromas of sweet red cherry along with spices and earth notes.

On November 1st, our wine team went up to Napa to help Sam bottle the 2017 vintage Nouveau. A very small production – she was working with a new vineyard for the Nouveau – we bottled about 60 cases which are already sold out at the winery. Luckily, we managed to get a good allocation of it so we will have some for our Markets but they’re selling fast with our 20% off case sale happening this month. The wine retails for $19.99.



 
Jason Rose

Meet the Chefs Behind Dinner at Bi-Rite

In the Bi-Rite family of businesses, we’re lucky to have an amazingly talented crew to bring you good food, from the smiling faces scooping up the newest flavor at the Creamery, to our buyers selecting the best, most flavorful products for the markets, to our operations teams making sure everything runs smoothly.

For the next few weeks, we’re giving a little extra love to the amazingly talented chefs behind the scenes at Bi-Rite, with a focus on their passion for our Dinner offerings. With experience at some of the top restaurants around the country and a true commitment to what they do, the chefs at Bi-Rite bring to life our philosophy of love, passion and integrity through our evening dinners. Each day the chefs craft their own dinner menu, featuring new dishes alongside some eternal favorites, and then have everything ready for you starting at 4:30pm, so you can stop in and grab a delicious, prepared meal to go.

Get to know the chefs that can help you get Dinner Ready every day.

Dinner_Salad  Dinner_Chicken  Dinner_Zoodles2

Noel Franco, Sous Chef, Bi-Rite Market 18th Street

Chef Noel Franco has had a diverse culinary career in the Bay Area. He hasn’t shied away from a challenge, be it restaurants, food trucks, large scale banquets, butchering, or the kitchens of Bi-Rite.

He loves cooking with garlic: whether sautéing to get a nutty flavor, roasting a full head, or adding it raw to offer some heat to a dish.

Chef Noel enjoys the freedom of Bi-Rite Dinner, given that his “office” is a kitchen located within a grocery story. He says, “I can walk down an aisle and grab an item off the shelf and cook with it. This is the job chefs dream of. It gives me the freedom to try different cooking techniques as often as I like too. You have the freedom to come in every day with a blank slate, create a whole new menu as unique and challenging as you would like, and cook it.”

Jason Sumner, Sous Chef, Bi-Rite Market Divisadero

Chef Jason Sumner loves bright flavors and colors, and he has the highest respect for food, especially cheeses, honey, and farm-direct produce.

He loves the creative aspects of Bi-Rite dinner. For one, dinner chefs can try new things that may eventually take off in other areas of the store, from the deli case, to prepared foods, to the regular dinner menu offerings. Plus, utilizing ingredients that might otherwise go to waste helps respect the produce and meat that might otherwise go back out to pasture.

In Jason’s opinion, Bi-Rite Dinner helps separate Bi-Rite from other markets. “Our guests can get restaurant quality meals every night of the week, and they depend on making it part of their evening. Whether it coincides with their shopping or they are coming specifically for dinner, they know dinner is coming.”

Jay Abrams, Chef of Culinary Innovation

Jay Abrams is our chef of Culinary Innovation at Bi-Rite, and he’s earned his kitchen cred working in kitchens in and around the Bay Area. His close relationships with local farmers and ranchers combined with his experience in fine dining allows Chef Jay to develop our prepared and house-made food at Bi-Rite. Fun fact: he’s an avid oil painter and channels that creativity through the food he makes.

We love his passion for bringing our guests joy and satisfaction through what they eat.

Chef Jay’s favorite ingredient to work with is chilies! He says, “They can be subtle yet provide a complex palate adding heat, sweetness, meatiness, earthiness and sour flavors. Chilies are also one of the most versatile ingredients often found in cuisines throughout the world. They’re great on their own, fermented into pastes and sauces, or even pickled.”



 
Trac

Red Wines to Chill With

It seems like there’s nothing better to drink during the summer is rosé all day but there comes a point that you can’t simply drink any more rosé. If not rosé, what else can one possibly drink? A crisp white wine like Sancerre is always an excellent (although maybe boring) option. May I suggest something bold, like a bottle of chilled red wine? Yes, red wine.

You might think this is a little crazy and extreme, keep in mind that not all red wines are meant to be served cold like big malbecs and oaky Napa cabernet. Definitely not. I’m talking about low-alcohol reds that are light in color and fruit driven. Something like a Lambrusco, Gamay, or a Blaufrankisch. These wines generally have more vibrant fruit and less tannins, the colder temperature shows off its juicy vibrancy and makes the wine more refreshing. Stay away from tannic reds however, as tannins becomes very harsh if chilled.

Here are some light reds that we carry at Bi-Rite that are excellent for a nice afternoon of BBQ party or a nice hot summer day. These wines pair particularly well with meats like lamb or charred seafood dishes.

Herve Villemade Cheverny Rouge Loire Valley, France 2016 $17.99 – Hervé tried traditional farming for a while before converting entirely to organic farming in 2000. The quality of his wines since the conversion is dramatically better! This red is really pretty with aromas of plum, strawberry, and earthy citrus.

Vins Contes Poivre et Sel VdP Loire, France 2016 $21.99 – Sommelier turned winemaker, Olivier Lemasson was a proponent of natural wines early in his career, being influenced by producers like Marcel Lapierre and Hervé Villemade. This bright and fresh cuvée is one of our favorites with aromas of white pepper and excellent fruitiness.

Birgit and Katrin Pfneizel “Blaufränker” Burgunland, Austria 2016 $14.99 – A delicious and fun liter-sized Blaufränkisch from the Pfneiszl sisters in Hungary. Blaufränker! really showcases their personalities – it’s vibrant, pretty, and aromatic. Tasting a little bit like Gamay and Cab Franc, this wine can be enjoyed with everything.



 
Sarah Arndt

Bi-Rite Pride

Our community goes beyond the four walls of our stores. This June, we are asking our guests, our staff, and our non-profit partners to come together and show our Bi-Rite pride – in support and celebration of LGBTQQ advocacy and organizing in San Francisco.

How can YOU help?Pride_Produce_horz

Our Bi-Rite Pride campaign runs from Wednesday, May 24 through Pride weekend, Monday, June 26.

Visit either of our markets and make a donation when you are checking out at the register. You can round up your bill or make a donation in the increment of your choosing.

Shop our Bi-Rite Creamery Soft Serve window (find the daily flavor here!), and support the Bi-Rite Pride Campaign!  5% of all soft serve sales will go to our non-profit partners.*

Spread the word with #BiRitePride

WHO am I supporting?

We are working with the following nonprofit partners because they do their work right here in our beloved city, they have a long track record of grassroots organizing and community impact, and our staff helped choose them!

LYRIC is a community resource center that builds a positive and vibrant future for LBGTQQ youth. Their mission is to build community and inspire positive social change through education enhancement, career trainings, health promotion, and leadership development with LGBTQQ youth, their families, and allies of all races, classes, genders, and abilities. They envision a diverse society where LGBTQQ youth are embraced for who they are and encouraged to be who they want to be.

The Dyke March brings the dyke communities together to celebrate unity, raise consciousness and be visible. Organized by a volunteer-run coalition, the annual march takes place during the week of Pride celebration (last weekend of June). The rally/cultural event showcases the dyke community’s artists, critical thinkers and political activists. It is one day where dykes can proclaim space, rights, visibility and respect.

TGI Justice Project: Supports transgender, gender variant, and intersex people impacted by incarceration, detention, and policing through the creation of a unified family in the struggle for survival and freedom. TGIJP is led by low income transgender women of color and their families who are in prison, formerly incarcerated, or targeted by the police.  They work in collaboration with others to forge a culture of resistance and resilience to strengthen each other for the fight against human rights abuses, imprisonment, police violence, racism, poverty, and societal pressures. They seek to create a world rooted in self- determination, freedom of expression, and gender justice.

Our contribution:

Our Bi-Rite Pride campaign is part of our Community Mission to make a difference by empowering youth, strengthening community, and creating resilience. Through our collective efforts, we hope to create a healthier, more equitable and thriving community for all. You can read more about our Community Programs and Outreach here. For more information, please reach out to our Community Coordinator, Sarah Arndt: sarah.arndt@biritemarket.com .

 

*5% of sales up to $1,500.00



 
Trac

Bi-Rite Wine Club: May Release

Terres Dorées Beaujolais Blanc Burgundy, France 2015| $19.99

Terres Dorées is the domaine of Beaujolais icon Jean-Paul Brun, one of the most revered wine growers in the region. In the early 1990’s, Jean-Paul Brun planted several hectares of Chardonnay on limestone soil, which is perfect for the grape in warmer climates. As demand increased, he expanded his holdings and began contracting for grapes with other local vignerons with limestone soils. The climate allows Jean-Paul to produce a rich wine with lots of character, while the soils bring a fresh mineral component.

Fermented in stainless steel tanks that are laid on their side for more lees contact, this wine is rich with a terrific mineral finish. With a fresh and fruity bouquet when young, this wine becomes more honeyed as it matures, but is always lip-smacking and delicious. Pair it with roasted salmon.

 

Point Ormond Sauvignon Blanc Frankland River, Australia 2016 | $16.99

Point Ormond is everything that’s exciting about Australian wine today: delicious, high acid, lower alcohol, versatile, bursting with personality, sometimes quirky, and always affordable. In a nutshell: these tasty wines hugely over-deliver for their price. The wines are an exploration of vineyard sites around Australia, and this Sauvignon Blanc is from Frankland River in Southwest Australia, which is known for its cool climate, perfect for maintaining acidity in white wines. The Sauvignon Blanc is very balanced, with notes of tropical passionfruit and delicate floral, herbal nuances. Try it with a green-veggie focused salad, perfect for late spring.

 

La Capranera Falanghina IGP Paestum Campania, Italy 2016  | $16.99

La Capranera, which means “black goat” in Italian, is named for the indigenous breed of goats – cilentana nera – that graze in the national park near where the grapes for these wines are grown. Once on the verge of becoming extinct, the goats have had a resurgence in population, just as wines from Campania have recently enjoyed increased international visibility.

 

La Capranera’s young vines are sustainably farmed using organic viticulture methods and harvested by hand. This white is made from Falanghina, a varietal indigenous to the Campania region, and it may have been used in ancient times to make Rome’s famous Falernian wine. This versatile white is delicious with fresh cheeses, such as Mozzarella di Bufala, as well as with shellfish and seafood.

Château Sainte-Marie Entre-Deux-Mers Rouge Bordeaux, France 2014 | $19.99

In the green rolling hills of Entre-Deux-Mers, between the Garonne and the Dordogne Rivers in Bordeaux, Stéphane Dupuch has been working his 35-hectare family estate since 1997. When his father, Gilles, took the reins in 1982, the estate was a sideline business to an insurance brokerage.

 

Thanks to his duel vocations, Gilles never fell into the traps of rapid expansion and over-mechanization that beguiled many of their neighbors. While others wonder why the Dupuchs keep a dozen cattle grazing on AOC land instead of planting that land to vines, Château Sainte-Marie takes the path-less-traveled through their advocacy of denser vine plantings, lower yields, and sustainable farming. Although Gilles has recently retired, his legacy lives on through Stéphane, who has made his own commitment to the family terroirs by converting the estate to organic and biodynamic farming. This red is a blend of Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon with rich fruit and silky texture. It’s delicious and perfect with a nice piece of steak.

 

The Pinot Project Pinot Noir California 2016 | $14.99

The Pinot Project began in 2009 with a vision: a wine for the palate, the pocket, and the people. Renowned wine importer Michael Skurnik called on his experiences in the vineyards and cellars of Northern California to craft a silky, fruit-forward, and harmonious Pinot Noir. The Pinot Project Pinot Noir is handcrafted from high-quality Sonoma County, Monterey, and Central Coast vineyards. The diversity in soil and climate from these AVAs contributes to depth in character, balance, and pristine fruit. The grapes are harvested at optimal ripeness and then destemmed in order to express bright fruit flavors and maintain freshness. The wine is fermented in stainless steel, and 20% of the blend is aged for 5 months in French oak. We love this delicious casual wine, which goes with any occasion, from sipping while cooking dinner or at a backyard BBQ with friends.

 

Geyerhof “StockWerk” Zweigelt, Kremstal, Austria 2015| $16.99

Although Kremstal — an appellation in the Danube Valley situated around the old Austrian town of Krems — is best-known for its white wines, it enjoys a slightly warmer climate than in the nearby Wachau, where the valley is narrower. Thanks to these conditions, the Maier family from Geyerhof grows organic Zweigelt in deep, sandy soil on east-facing slopes for their StockWerk project. The name StockWerk, which means work (Werk) on the vine (Stock) in German, reflects the philosophy of the Maier family, a pioneer of organic viticulture in Kremstal. With its light peppery nose, aromas of sour cherry and violet, and a lively and refreshing mouthfeel, the StockWerk Zweigelt pairs beautifully with a wide range of foods. It is particularly tasty with sautéed pork chops with tomatoes, bell peppers, and paprika.



 
Trac

Bi-Rite Wine Club: April Release

Our April Wine Club allocations came out last week, and we’re excited to share more about the great springtime wines in our Discovery Club. From Provence to Piemonte, Lebanon to Washington, these wines are delectable by the glass, or paired with spring dishes. Find them in the store to try a bottle, and join the club to get in on the fun!

Discovery Club April 2017

Domaine du Bagnol Cassis Blanc Provence, France 2014 | $22.99

Domaine du Bagnol in Cassis, France sits beneath a limestone outcropping just 200 meters from the Mediterranean in Provence. Sea breezes and a trio of winds cool the vineyards, bringing nice acidity and notes of ocean spray to the wine. A blend of Marsanne, Clairette and Ugni Blanc, this dry wine is the perfect match for seafood dishes and fresh vegetables.

 

Luigi Ferrando Erbaluce di Caluso “La Torrazza” Alta Piemonte, Italy 2014 | $21.99

Luigi Ferrando has long been the leading producer of wines from the Canavese region in Piemonte, Italy, where his family’s winemaking tradition dates back to 1900. Luigi and his sons, Roberto and Andrea, make mind-blowing Nebbiolos, and they are the standard bearer of the local white grape, Erbaluce, which is only found in the alpine foothills of this corner of Piemonte. Bright acidity, elegant minerality, and complex structure make it the ultimate flexible white wine. We love it with seafood risotto.

 

Division Wine Company “l’Avoiron” Gamay Rosé  Yakima, WA 2016 | $19.99

Kate Norris and Thomas Monroe founded Division Winemaking Company in 2010. Inspired by the wineries of France, where Kate and Thomas first learned winemaking, their urban winery creates a variety of Oregon and Washington Wines with minimal manipulation. The Gamay grapes for this rosé were sourced from Willard Hills in the cool Yakima Valley, and the wine is crisp and vibrant, with notes of strawberry, peach, and chalky lime. Pair it with grilled spring veggies with garlic aioli.

 

Agostino Pavia Grignolino d’Asti Piemonte, Italy 2015 | $16.99

Grignolino is a lesser-known red grape from Piemonte, home to Nebbiolo, Barbera, and Dolcetto, that often gets overlooked. Made by Pino Pavia from Agostino Pavia, a 50-year-old, small, family-run estate, this gem is described by importer Oliver McCrum as “Misleadingly pale color, but a very distinctive and flavorful wine; wild strawberries, rhubarb, a touch of herbs, the perfect wine with salumi or pizza. I put it in the fridge for 20 minutes to bring out the fruit.”

 

Massaya “Le Colombier” Red Blend Bekaa Valley, Lebanon 2015  | $19.99

Massaya is the brainchild of two dynamic Lebanese brothers who brought together the potential of their terroir with the know-how of two French wine-making dynasties. Ramzi and Sami Ghosn partnered with the teams from Vieux Télégraphe and Cheval Blanc in 1998 to launch the winery. This red is a blend of Cinsault, Grenache, Syrah, and Tempranillo: full-bodied, fresh, and approachable, with aromas full of warm spice and red fruits. It pairs well with lamb with Mediterranean spices and mint.

 

Disruption Wine Company Red Blend Columbia Valley, WA 2014 | $16.99

 

“More wine, less ego” is the motto at Disruption Wine Company, and each bottle is comprised of pedigree fruit sourced from small vineyards in Washington State. Since 2014, Disruption Wine Company has been committed to producing value-driven Washington wines, each of which are reflective of Andrew Latta’s honed skills in the region. This is a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon and Malbec, deep and dark with vibrancy and freshness on the palate. Pair it with grilled steak with salsa verde.

Ready to join the Bi Rite Wine Club and get your monthly shipment of wines? Join here!



 
Sana Javeri Kadri

Cook Your Heart Out with Phyllis Grant

 #BiRiteCommunityEats with Phyllis Grant of Dash and Bella

FullSizeRender[15]Last weekend, we let Phyllis Grant of @dashandbella loose in the Market and asked her to please, cook her heart out. This weekend, she’ll be taking over our Instagram to give us a peek into the deliciousness that came out of it.

Phyllis’ cooking is the avocado and citrus laden dreams that we always hoped for Northern Californian cuisine to be, with a serious dollop of crème fraiche and real talk on the side. Just looking up #hellasalads on Instagram ignites a desire for crisp romaine hearts and green goddess dressing we never knew we had, and an ache for anchovies we never ever signed up for. Such is the power of Phyllis.

FullSizeRender[8]

Phyllis’ #BiRiteCommunityEats Weekend Menu:

Baby Gem and Radicchio Treviso Salad

Citrus Layer Salad

Anchovy, Gouda and Crème Fraiche Toasts

Beer Braised Beef Tacos with Quick Pickled Jalapeños and Onions

Chocolate Brown Butter Cupcake Brownies

Saturday: Make your crème fraiche and pickles, make your dessert-  just pop those suckers out of the cupcake pan right after they cool so they don’t stick and put them in a ziploc bag until tomorrow.

Sunday: Make your stew, while stew cooks, make your toasts and vinaigrette for salad, when the stew is out of the oven and the meat is cooling, prep you salads by washing greens and cutting citrus, shred the meat and put back into braising liquid, assemble salads but don’t dress, assemble toasts and EAT. Dress salads, put out condiments for tacos, heat tortillas and reheat meat, assemble, FEAST. 

CRÈME FRAICHE

 2 parts heavy cream

1 part buttermilk

Find a large glass jar. Fill it halfway up with heavy cream. Add half as much buttermilk. Stir. Let it fester at room temperature. All weekend. Without a lid. Leave it in your windowsill or next to your stove or on your kitchen table. If there are any kids around, give them the job of stirring it a few times a day. And tasting it. It will thicken. It will start to make your mouth pucker. Take it further than you think you should (in hot and humid weather, the souring process can happen very quickly so be vigilant). When you’re pleased with the flavor, cover and store it in the fridge.

FullSizeRender[3]QUICK PICKLES

 I use red wine vinegar for red onions. I avoid white onions because they can get slimy. A combination of white, champagne, and apple cider vinegar works well for jalapeños. Use the brine for everything from salad dressing to meat marinade. Don’t try to pickle the red onions and jalapeños together, it will not be pleasant or pretty.

 1 cup vinegar

1 tsp kosher salt

2 tsp white sugar

½ red onion OR 6 jalapenos

Combine 1 cup vinegar, 1 tsp kosher salt, and 2 tsp white sugar. Bring it to the boil. Turn down to a simmer. Add your pickling ingredient. Cook for one minute. Turn of the heat. Cool. They keep for a few weeks in the fridge.

FullSizeRender[11]CHOCOLATE BROWN BUTTER CUPCAKE BROWNIES

Dude. These are so decadent. And so easy. Just trust that you don’t want to overcook them so follow the recipe pretty carefully. And they are hella hard to get out of the cupcake pan so use lots of butter/flour or non-stick spray. And definitely use a non-stick cupcake pan or else you will be cursing me. My mom likes them with crème fraîche. My husband likes them with vanilla ice cream. My brother likes them with crème fraîche AND ice cream. I like them for breakfast with coffee. They freeze beautifully!

Recipe via Food52

BEER BRAISED BEEF TACOS

If you don’t have a powerful blender like a Vitamix, don’t add the parsley and cilantro stems, just add the leaves. 

6-pound chuck roast

salt and pepper for seasoning

1-2 beers (i usually drink half of the 2nd one while cooking)

1 glass white or red wine

1 cup crushed San Marzano tomatoes

1/2 bunch cilantro, stems and leaves

1/3 bunch parsley, stems and leaves

3 cloves garlic, peeled

1/4 cup pickled red onions

1/4 cup pickled jalapeños plus brine

1 teaspoon kosher salt

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Preheat your oven to 300°F. 
Open your windows. Turn on your oven vent if you have one. Season your chuck roast on all sides with salt and pepper. Crank heat in a Dutch oven or any other ovenproof pot with a lid that will accommodate your chuck roast and braising liquid. Add a splash of canola oil. When the oil starts to smoke, carefully add your roast. Cook a few minutes on each side. Be brave. You want some deep dark brown color to add flavor. Remove roast and rest on a plate. Turn off the heat under the Dutch oven. You will come back to this post so don’t clean it yet.

In your blender, blend the heck out of the beer, wine, tomatoes, cilantro, parsley, garlic, pickled onions/jalapenos, and salt. Blitz until almost smooth. Pour into your hot Dutch oven. Careful. It might splatter a bit if it’s still hot. Use a wooden spoon to remove the goodies on the bottom of the pan and incorporate into the braising liquid. Gently lower your roast into liquid (it should come up about halfway). But no stress if it doesn’t, you can always add a bit more beer, wine, or any kind of meat or vegetable stock. Put on the lid. Cook for 3-4 hours. Check after two hours. It’s ready when it shreds easily by pulling the meat apart with two forks. Take meat out of the liquid. Cool until you can handle it with your fingers.

I hate it when I bite into a taco and I get a gelatinous blob of fat. This extra step will prevent this disaster. If there is string wrapped around the chuck roast, take it off. Then, with your fingers, slowly tear the whole thing apart. It’s nice to have some strips of meat so don’t over-shred it. But anytime you find anything slimy or fatty, set it aside. Feed it to your dog.

Serve the braised meat on warm tortillas with crème fraîche, jalapeño pickles, red onion pickles, and cilantro leaves.

FullSizeRender[13]ANCHOVY, GOUDA, CREME FRAICHE TOASTS

Preheat oven to 350°F. Thinly slice a baguette. Spread out in one layer on a cookie sheet. Paint one side with garlic oil. Sprinkle with Aleppo pepper and coarse salt. Flip over and do the other side. Bake until crisp all the way through and lightly browned. Around 15 minutes. Cool. With a vegetable peeler, make wispy pieces of Gouda (or Parmesan). On each toast, layer one slice of gouda, a Boquerón, and then a big dot of crème fraîche. If you like a little kick, add a small piece of jalapeño pickle.

CITRUS LAYER SALAD

FullSizeRender[16]I used a combination of blood oranges, Cara Cara navel oranges, pink grapefruits, and Kishu mandarins. This can be garnished with mint for dessert. Or if you’re a savory person like me, you can turn it into a refreshing salad to go with tacos (particularly essential if you’ve eaten too many jalapeño pickles). This can sit for an hour or so but be warned that it can get a bit juicy beyond that as the salted citrus loses its water.

Chop a few scallions and place them in a bowl. Add a splash of jalapeño pickle brine (or champagne vinegar) and a few tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil. Microplane in 1/2-clove garlic and a few swipes of lemon zest. Stir.

Using an incredibly sharp serrated knife, peel your citrus. Slice thinly (east to west) making delicate discs. Layer on a plate, overlapping a bit but not stacked like pancakes. Sprinkle with a few pinches salt. Spoon the olive oil and scallion mixture all over the sliced citrus. Garnish with whole cilantro leaves.

BABY GEM AND RADDICHIO TREVISO SALAD

I have been torturing my kids with radicchio salads for the past few months. I am in love. They are getting there. Here is the key: honey. Your vinaigrette must be sweet in order to balance out the bitterness of the greens. You can also bring in some sweetness and fat with nuts, fruit, and cheese. But because I was making beef tacos, I decided to keep the salad simple.

1 tablespoon diced shallot

1/2 clove microplaned garlic

juice of one lemon

1 teaspoon lemon zest

1 tablespoon champagne, white wine, or sherry wine vinegar

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/4 cup chopped parsley

Big bowl of greens (any combination of radicchio, Treviso radicchio, baby gems, escarole, endive)

FullSizeRender[1]Put shallots, garlic, lemon juice/zest, vinegar, and oil into a jar with a tight lid. Shake the heck out of it. Dip a leaf into the vinaigrette and taste. You want it to be a little sweet and quite acidic. These greens need big flavor. Sprinkle greens with coarse salt and pepper. Add parsley. Add dressing a few splashes at a time. Toss. Taste. Add more if you like.

Fix heaping plates, eat well, look forward to leftovers. Congratulations, you’ve just cooked your heart out.

*All photographs were shot by Phyllis on her mighty iPhone!