Home Archive by category 'Meat, Fish & Poultry' (Page 3)

Archive for the ‘Meat, Fish & Poultry’ Category


Morgan

Christmas and New Years Menu 2012

Have you called us yet to order your Christmas, New Years, or Whatever-Holiday-Tradition-You-Choose dishes? We’re all ears, taking orders for our full menu at 415-241-9760; just make sure you call at least 48 hours before you’d like to pick up!

Printable Christmas and New Years Menu (pdf)

Make like you’re at In-N-Out Burger and order off the menu! We have a secret item to share with you: our Savory Bread Pudding with Wild Mushrooms and Gruyère ($14.99) serves 6.

We also have you covered on holiday meats like Five Dot Ranch’s pasture raised prime rib (their 100% Cali-born and bred cattle are never fed corn or soy!), Grimaud Farm’s fresh Whole Geese, and more–check out page 10 of our Holiday Guide.

And don’t forget to place your order for the Creamery’s fresh baked Christmas Stollen or Buche de Noel before it’s too late–more details on page 13 of our Holiday Guide.

 


Morgan

Hanukkah Menu 2012

One week until the festival of lights begins! Our kitchen is planning to cook all of your favorites. We’re taking pre-orders for our Hanukkah Menu now–give us a call at 415-241-9760! Please place your order 48 hours in advance of when you’d like to pick it up–the menu is available December 6th – 16th.

Or come into the Market any day during Hanukkah–these dishes will be available in our deli and refrigerator section on a first come, first serve basis.

Printable Hanukkah Menu (pdf)

 

Our butchers are ready with all of your favorite cuts of meat for the holiday, including Marin Sun Farms Grass Fed Brisket and Pasture Raised Whole Chickens–check out page 10 of our Holiday Guide for our offerings!

The Creamery’s baking up Chocolate Babka, plus their fresh baked Challah and flourless macaroons for a sweet end to your feast.


Faun

Holiday Turkey Preparation Guide

What follows is our authoritative guide to making your bird and side dishes shine! Included are the following recipes and tips (scroll to the bottom for a printable version):

  • Our Tips for Roasting Heritage Turkeys
  • Recipe for Deconstructed Heritage Turkey with Roast Breast & Braised Legs
  • Recipe for Whole Roast Heritage Turkey
  • Recipe for Traditional Roast Broad-Breasted Turkey
  • Reheating Instructions for Items on our Holiday Menus

Our Tips for Roasting Heritage Turkeys

•    Heritage birds typically have a humped breast bone, and the bird will be somewhat leaner.
•    We recommend that Heritage turkeys not be brined; this ensures the best possible texture, and maintains the natural intense  flavor of these special birds.
•    Let the turkey come to room temperature before roasting.
•    Let the turkey rest for at least 20 minutes prior to slicing. This ensures evenly juicy meat.
•    Because of Heritage turkeys’ unique breast-to-leg ratio, the breast will reach doneness long before the legs and thighs. There are two ways to address this: Either roast the bird whole until the breasts are done, and then finish cooking the legs separately, or remove and braise just the legs and roast the rest of the turkey whole

Recipe for Deconstructed Heritage Turkey with Roast Breast & Braised Legs
As featured in our November 2010 Food & Wine article, “A Farm Fresh Thanksgiving”
We highly recommend this recipe! It’s also great for a traditional broad-breasted turkey.

Ingredients
One 12-20 pound turkey
1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt, plus more for seasoning
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
4 garlic cloves, halved
2 celery ribs, cut into 2-inch lengths
1 carrot, peeled and cut into 2-inch lengths
1 onion, sliced
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 cup dry white wine
6 cups Turkey Stock or low-sodium broth
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
10 sage leaves
12 thyme sprigs
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
Freshly ground pepper

Cut the legs and wings off of the turkey; separate the drumsticks and thighs. Using poultry shears, cut off the backbone. (Reserve the wings, neck and backbone for making stock.) Set the breast, thighs and drumsticks on a rimmed baking sheet and sprinkle all over with the 1 1/2 tablespoons of salt. Cover and refrigerate for at least 8 hours or up to 24 hours.

Rinse the turkey parts and pat dry. In a large enameled cast-iron casserole, heat the olive oil. Add the thighs and drumsticks and cook over moderate heat until well browned all over, about 15 minutes. Transfer the turkey to a platter.

Add the garlic, celery, carrot and onion to the casserole. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables just begin to soften, about 5 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste and cook for 1 minute. Add the wine and cook until reduced by half, about 5 minutes. Return the thighs and drumsticks to the casserole and add 4 cups of the Turkey Stock. Cover and braise over low heat until the turkey is tender, about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Transfer the turkey to the platter; strain the braising liquid and return it to the casserole.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350°. Spread half of the butter under the turkey breast skin; tuck in the sage and thyme. Spread the remaining butter over the skin.

Heat a large ovenproof skillet. Add the turkey breast, skin side down, and cook over moderately high heat until browned, 12 minutes. Turn the breast skin side up and transfer the skillet to the oven. Roast the turkey breast for about 1 hour, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the meat registers 150°. Transfer the breast to a cutting board and let rest for 15 minutes. Add the remaining 2 cups of turkey stock to the skillet and bring to a boil, stirring to scrape up any browned bits on the bottom.

Boil the braising liquid in the casserole until reduced to 3 cups, about 10 minutes. Add the stock from the skillet. In a small bowl, whisk the flour with 1/4 cup of water; whisk this mixture into the liquid in the casserole and boil, whisking frequently, until the gravy is lightly thickened, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Transfer the gravy to a gravy boat.

Remove the bones from the thighs and slice the meat 1/2 inch thick. Transfer the thigh meat to a roasting pan along with the drumsticks. Cover with foil and reheat. Carve the turkey breast and arrange on a platter. Arrange the dark meat alongside; serve with the gravy.

NOTE: If you aren’t comfortable cutting up a turkey, you can prepare this recipe using a 7-pound turkey breast on the bone, plus 5 pounds of turkey drumsticks and/or thighs.

Recipe for Whole Roast Heritage Turkey
Courtesy of Chef Dan Barber of Stone Barns and Blue Hill, NY

 

Ingredients
BN Ranch Heritage Turkey
butter
salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 475 degrees.

Let turkey come to room temperature. Carefully separate skin from the breast meat and rub softened butter on to breast. Season liberally with salt and pepper.

Set the turkey, breast side up, on the rack of a large roasting pan. Tie the legs together with kitchen string. Roast for 20 minutes.

Lower the oven temperature to 350 degrees and cover turkey loosely with tin foil. Roast until the thermometer inserted into the inner thigh registers 150 degrees (2 to 3 hours, depending on turkey size).

Transfer turkey to cutting board. Let stand for at least 45 minutes to cool down. Remove legs and thighs, careful to not take too much skin with you.

Place thighs, skin side, on a roasting pan and continue cooking 40-45 minutes or until juices run clear. Separately slice breast and thigh and plate while still warm.

Recipe for Traditional Broad-Breasted Turkey

After removing neck and giblets from the body cavity, rinse the bird with cold water. Pat cavities and body dry with a paper towel. Rub body and neck cavities with salt if desired, and stuff loosely. Truss neck cavity with metal skewer and truss legs. To remove the truss just lift the ring and pull it up and over the end of the drumstick. To secure the truss, hold the drumsticks together, lift the ring and pull it over the drumsticks.

Spread exterior of turkey with a blend of your favorite herbs and spices or with a paste made of the following ingredients:

4 Tbsp oil (melted butter or olive oil)
4 tsp. salt, or to taste
2 tsp. paprika

Heat oven to 325º F. Place bird in open pan, breast side up. Pour two 8 ounce cups of water in bottom of pan. Place in oven. If roasting turkey unstuffed then decrease roasting time by approximately 30 minutes. There is no need to turn the bird while roasting as it will brown to a rich, golden color. However, a piece of foil should be placed loosely over the breast for the last hour of roasting.

Take the temperature by inserting a meat thermometer in the thigh joint, where the leg connects to the breast; the turkey is done when it reads 155-160°. When done, the thickest part of the drumstick will feel soft. Remove from oven. Let stand 15 minutes before carving.

Weight    Approximate        Time to Start
(lbs)      Roasting Time     Checking Temperature

6-10 lbs.      approx. 2 hrs.          1 ½ hrs.
10-12 lbs      3 – 3 ¼ hrs.            2 ½ hrs.
12-14 lbs.     3 ¼  – 3 ½  hrs.      2 ½ hrs.
14-16 lbs.     3 ½  – 3 ¾  hrs.      2 ¾ hrs.
16-18 lbs.     3 ¾  – 4 hrs.            3 hrs.
18-20 lbs.     4 – 4 ½  hrs.           3 ¼ hrs.
20-22 lbs.     4 ½  – 5 hrs.          3 ¾ hrs.
22-24 lbs.     5 – 5 ½  hrs.          4 hrs.
24-26 lbs.     5 ½  – 5 ¾  hrs.    4 ¾ hrs.

Reheating Instructions for Items on our Holiday Menus

House Roasted Diestel Ranch Turkey Breast
Place turkey in a shallow baking dish and pour ¼ to ½ cup broth over the turkey. Cover with foil and reheat in a 325 degree oven for 40 minutes or until hot

Whole Roasted Diestel Ranch Turkey
Place turkey in a baking pan and cover with foil. Roast at 325 degrees for 1-1/2 to 2 hours until heated thru or to taste.

Soups
Microwave: 3 to 5 minutes, or until hot
Stovetop: Pour soup into a saucepan and simmer on low heat, stirring to avoid burning, until hot.

Mashed Potatoes / Sweet Potato Mash
Microwave: medium for 4 to 6 minutes or until hot
Oven: Place in a shallow, oven proof dish and heat in a 325 degree oven until hot, about 40 minutes

Stuffing
Oven: Place in a shallow, oven proof dish. Dot with sliced of butter (optional) to add extra richness and crispness. Bake for 40 minutes to 1 hour, until hot and slightly crispy on top

Brussels Sprouts and Other Veggies
Microwave: 3 to 5 minutes, or until hot
Stovetop: Sauté with butter or olive oil in a large sauté pan until heated thru

Gravy
Microwave: 3 to 5 minutes, or until hot
Stovetop: Place in a sauce pan and simmer on low heat, stirring to avoid burning, until hot

Printable Guide- page 1 (pdf)

Printable Guide- page 2 (pdf)


Chili

Do the Turkey Tango: Pre-Order Yours Today!

Can you believe Thanksgiving is just two weeks and two days away!? Are you ready to cook your bird and dig into some cozy fall dishes?

Come by the Market today from 4-7 to taste our roasted BN Ranch Heritage Turkey, along with favorite side dishes on our Thanksgiving Menu (including several veggie-friendly), available for pre-order now. And don’t forget the Creamery’s famous Pumpkin Bundt Cake and pies!

Have you ordered your turkey yet? We have five fresh turkey options available for pre-order–check them out on page nine of our Holiday Guide!

We’re here to help, 9 am – 9 pm every day (call us at 415-241-9760).

And while you still have a couple weeks to plot your course, check out our authoritative guide to making your bird and side dishes shine!


Holiday Guide & Menus 2012

Click here to view and print our Holiday Guide! We’re taking pre-orders now, give us a call at 415-241-9760 x 3.

We’re so excited to bring you our first ever Holiday Guide, your one stop shop for a tasty holiday, Bi-Rite style. Inside you’ll find:

-Thanksgiving, Christmas and Hanukkah menus

-Turkey options: pre-order yours today!

-Holiday Wine Blitz details

-Sweet Weeks details

-Catering ideas–platters or full service

-Cheese platter tips and our favorites for the holiday

-Pies, holiday ice cream and other sweets from Bi-Rite Creamery

-Gift ideas: 18 Reasons classes, gift boxes, chocolates, special occasion booze, and more…

-Ordering info and deadlines for holiday pre-orders

 

 


Ian

Register Recipe: Benton’s Old Fashioned

Despite the recent string of San Francisco Indian Summer days, fall is definitely here. The nights are cool and clear and the light is changing. In the Market stone fruit has been replaced by an array of apples and pears in every color, texture and flavor. Brussels sprouts, chicories and winter squash are coming in as well, and in every department we’re helping our guests with fall recipes. With all this in mind I thought I’d offer a seasonally appropriate cocktail, something a little stronger and with all the right flavors of harvest to compliment an early fall night…

This recipe is borrowed and modified from Jim Meehan’s PDT Cocktail Book, one of the year’s best reference books from Meehan’s New York bar. Mixologist Don Lee created the beverage to bring together one of his favorite pork products with one of his favorite spirits.

Allan Benton is a famous producer of traditional hickory-smoked hams from Monroe County, Tennessee. His bacon is prized for its rich, smoky character and has earned such accolades as “World’s Best Bacon” from Esquire Magazine. In the cocktail, the hickory smoke complements the spice of the bourbon and the rich sweetness of maple syrup; it’s a terrific play on the original elements of an Old-Fashioned.

Lee uses Four Roses Bourbon, but I’ve substituted the more economical Bulleit Bourbon which I’ve found to be a fine stand-in. Preparing the bourbon is simple and well worth the modest effort, and once prepared it’s shelf-stable!

The next time you wake up to a chill in the air and the desire to cook I hope you’ll enjoy this world-class bacon for breakfast and this perfect fall cocktail by the time the sun goes down (which is earlier, after all…)

 

Benton’s Old Fashioned

2 oz. Benton’s Bacon Fat-Infused Bulleit Bourbon (recipe below)

.25 oz. Mead & Meads Grade B Maple Syrup

2 dashes Angostura Bitters

Stir with ice and strain into a chilled rocks glass with one large cube. Garnish with an orange twist

 

Benton’s Bacon Fat-Infused Bulleit Bourbon

1.5 oz. Benton’s Bacon Fat

1 750-ml bottle Bulleit Bourbon

On low heat, warm the bacon fat in a small saucepan until it melts, about 5 min. Combine liquid fat and bourbon in a large, non-reactive container and stir. Infuse for 4 hours, then place container in freezer for 2 hours. Remove solid fat, fine-strain bourbon through a cheesecloth, and bottle.

 

 

 


Three Ranchers We Love

Don Watson

This fall we have some amazing opportunities to meet the ranchers we love working with at Bi-Rite.

The first on September 19th is a one-two knock-out series with Don Watson, our favorite sheep guy. Did you know he lends his wooly creatures to mow lawns across the Bay Area?  At the first class, watch Bi-Rite Butcher Zane Clark break down a whole lamb into primal and sub-primal cuts, then explain the best way to cook each cut of meat. To inspire your palate we’ll be serve up a lamb snack and beer. Tickets are $25 for members and $35 for the general public.

The following week on September 26th, meet Don in person over dinner and wine. Don and his wife will join us for a five course meal featuring his beautiful lamb prepared by Bi-Rite chef Wyatt Sandberg. For a delectable meal, wine and a talk with the rancher,  tickets are $50 for members and $60 for the general public.

Bill Niman

If you buy tickets to both you’ll get a discounted ticket price! If you can only come to one, that’s ok, too. Choose the class you prefer and sign up quick! Tickets for both Don Watson events are here.

Inspiration from our Farm Tour Series has led us to hit the road again on October 13th, this time heading north to BN Ranch to meet Bill & Nicolette Niman and Devil’s Gulch Ranch to meet Mark Pasternak and Myriam Kaplan-Pasternak. Mark will be whipping up lunch for us, cowboy style. Tickets for members are $40, for the general public $50. Tickets and more information about the ranch tour are here.

Mark Pasternak

Bill Niman is a pretty famous name around here for his beef production. His latest project, under the BN Ranch name, has shifted his focus on maturing beef to enhance flavor and texture. They are a grass based ranch that raises pasture raised cattle, heritage turkeys, and (sometimes) goats. They never use pesticides, herbicides, or artificial fertilizers on their land, use no irrigation, ground water or municipal water, and never administer hormones or antibiotics on their animals.

Devil’s Gulch Ranch, a diversified family farm located in Nicasio, Marin County, produces rabbits, pigs, sheep, premium wine grapes and asparagus for retail customers and direct sales to high-quality restaurants. Sustainable, humane agricultural practices and organic farming are utilized whenever possible.
What are you waiting for? Put on your favorite jeans and boots and join us!

 


Chili

Dine Out For Wild Salmon, take 2!

Tomorrow, Thursday August 23rd, 50% of sales of raw King Salmon from our fish case will go directly to Salmon Aid, to help spread the word about supporting wild salmon.

Wild salmon need our support–these legendary fish are in trouble! They face problems migrating upstream – dams block their path, climate change is warming their waters, and the rivers themselves are being diverted from their natural paths. Farmed salmon operations, meanwhile, are polluting the oceans and making it harder for wild salmon to successfully spawn.

We hope you’ll support our second annual “Dine Out for Wild Salmon” event. The money we raise will be used by Salmon Aid to increase awareness about the plight of West Coast salmon and the rivers they depend upon. This will educate the Bay Area public about the importance of protecting wild salmon, why they’re in trouble, and how we can work together to save them.

Salmon Aid will be in front of the Market tomorrow from 5:00 to 7:00 teaching our staff and guests about Wild Salmon–come by and pick their brain!


Chili

Fabrication Nation: Deli Team Lamb Breakdown

One of my favorite parts about being a butcher at Bi-Rite Market is getting to talk to people about where their food comes from.  Last week I was able to walk some of our deli team through the breakdown of a lamb.  We normally work with Don Watson and his Napa Valley Lambs, but recently Marc Cohodes of Alder Lane Farm (whose gorgeous pastured eggs we sell at the Market) has been exploring raising lamb and wanted us to help evaluate one of his animals.  I thought this would be the perfect opportunity to demo a lamb breakdown and give some members of our deli team the chance to see where the cuts that they sell every day come from, as well as talk through the various cooking methods for some of the underappreciated cuts.  As the demo wound down, everyone was excited about getting the chance to try some of the cuts and cooking methods that we had discussed.  Jenny, not a big lamb fan, was given a leg roast.  Robeen and Laura braised a shank and a neck, and Wes cooked a shoulder chop.  Here’s what each of them had to say about their lambfest:

Hi guys, my lamb turned out awesomely!  Beginners luck (maybe).  I marinated the leg in rosemary, garlic, evoo, salt and pepper for a couple hours. Then I added a little more salt and threw it in the cast iron. Seared it a little, then put it in the oven for a half hour. No muss, no fuss. Using my thermometer, cooked it to about medium, which I realize is how I like my meat. I let it rest for about 15 while I made some pasta, and it was perfect. Seriously, delicious. And I just used the leftovers with some veggies in a stirfry. The meat was super tender after being recooked. Thanks for encouraging me to try something new, Chili. It was great.

-Jenny


Hey guys, I finally cooked the lamb shank Chili gave me and want to share. I’ve never braised anything before so I was a little nervous, plus I was so tired when I got home that I was super close to just doing it another time, but I just sucked it up and braised it and I’m really glad I did. I started by frenching the shank then rubbing it with a nice layer of salt and pepper. Then I seared it and set it aside in my Dutch oven. I sweated the mirepoix, then added some beef stock and red wine and got it nice and hot for the oven. I then added it into the Dutch oven and stuck it in the oven at 300 to cook for about 3 hours, turning occasionally. I then took the liquid and veggies and reduced them quite a bit. The end result was a little salty, but that’s how I like it. I strained the veggies as a bed for the shank, then poured the reduced stock+wine on the shank. I apologize if this seems super simple to you but I wanted to share how I prepared it because I really wanna know how you all prepare yours. I hope all of your prospective lamb pieces turned out as great as I thought mine did :-) Bon appétit!

-Robeen

 

Ok, finally got a chance to cook my cut: lamb shoulder chop. Seasoned it well with salt, pepper, ground cumin, fresh-chopped rosemary, minced garlic clove & olive oil. Let sit for a while until it came to room temp. Seared it off in a blazing-hot cast iron skillet with butter and olive oil, meanwhile basting. Flipped after an imprecise 3 minutes. Basted quickly and dropped in the oven at 425. Checked after 10 mins (by touch: done). Also roasted russet potatoes with herbs in the oven. They turned out nicely. The cut was very fatty and chewy, the meat a mild pink color.  I might try slow-roasting it next time. If I were to sear and finish it in the over again, I might shave off a few minutes of oven time, or drop my temp to 375-400. Thanks again, Chili! The lamb butchery class was time well spent.

-Wes

Alrighty, last but not least…. All of yours sound so delicious! After looking in my fridge and around my kitchen I found that I was not in the least bit prepared to braise lamb as I usually would…. no onions, celery, savory herbs, carrots, stock, or even olive oil haha…but that didn’t stop me, oh no! After taking a peak in my flavor bible book (one of my favorites) I decided to take my lamb to a place I had never taken it before.  I made a spice rub from nutmeg, cinnamon, a little ground clove, salt and heavy pepper, and lightly coated the neck with that. I seared it as well as I could with some butter, removed it and put in about 3 cloves of roughly chopped garlic, threw in more butter until they got nice and golden, replaced my lamb and added water about half way up. I also added a small piece of vanilla bean. I covered it, and in the oven she goes at about 250…. after two hours I checked and it was coming along nicely, but I was getting hungry so I turned up the temp to 300, and after about 45 minutes she was oh so ready. I thought it a bit pathetic of me to reduce down my garlic butter water as a sauce, but I did have some polenta which I thought would taste great as a base…and it most totally did. There was much more flavor than I had ever anticipated from this neck, and the added fat already in the neck that released into the broth made the polenta really creamy. In the end I was happy I didn’t use so many extra ingredients this time because it made me realize how much flavor the neck really carries. Amazing! My pic is of the whole finished neck, but I ended up shredding it in my polenta to get all those juicy bits out, yum! And I didn’t even need an added sauce (although I did add a little more butter while cooking the polenta because I just really like butter). The baking spice flavor combination was fantastic, I actually wished that I had used more….I ate leftovers last night and again, delicious!

-Laura

 


Faun

Life, Liberty and the Prosciutto of Happiness

Independence Day is the perfect time to liberate our taste buds!  We’re celebrating traditionally cured hams inspired by the Italian Prosciutto di Parma and Spanish acorn fed Iberico–but these are made lovingly in Iowa, by Herb and Kathy Eckhouse, founders of La Quercia.  A glass of rosé and some slices of cured pork goodness will bring fireworks to your Fourth of July parade…

Tamworth Prosciutto – Tamworths are historically known as ‘the bacon pig’ for their thick, meaty bellies, excellent flavor, and golden fat. This pork comes from Russ Kremer’s Ozark Mountain Farm and 3 others in Osage County, Missouri. His family has been selecting red-haired Tamworth pigs—a threatened breed—for generations for their good temperament and hardiness outdoors.

Speck Americano – Made from Berkshire and Duroc hogs, this is a lightly apple wood smoked prosciutto.

Prosciutto Americano – This is the ham that started it all.  It’s sweet and clean with a floral minerality.

Coppa Americano – Made from the top of the pork shoulder, it’s cured with salt, pimento de la Vera, and cocoa.

Parade into the deli and have a taste!