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Archive for the ‘Cheese’ Category


Sana Javeri Kadri

Everything you need to know about December Festivities

The December holidays are upon us! This year, you’re sweater can be ugly, but your food doesn’t have to be! Whether you celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanza, the Winter Solstice, or simply hop from holiday party to holiday party, we want to make your holidays as convenient and easy as possible.  Read on for answers below to your most frequently asked questions and then some, from all the logistics including our complete meal solutions, holiday menus, gift ideas, how to give back to the community by supporting our fifth annual Toy Drive, and more.

When are you open?
Christmas: We’re open 9am to 9pm almost every day of December except Christmas Eve and Day. We’re open 9am to 5pm on Christmas Eve and closed on Christmas Day. We’re open as usual at 9am on 12/26, the day after Christmas.

New Year: We’re open 9am to 9pm on New Year’s Eve and 10am to 6pm on New Year’s Day.

You can now pre-order via our convenient NEW e-commerce website for in-store pick-up. Since internet never sleeps, 3am Christmas dinner shopping just got a whole lot easier!

How do I place a Christmas or Hanukkah menu order without having a meltdown in the wine aisle?
Pre-orders open on our Holiday E-Commerce site on 11/27 for all December Holiday and Gift Ordering. Stay in your pajamas, grab that extra bowl of cereal, and peruse our market offerings from your own personal internet technology!

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What are the pick-up times for Hanukkah, Christmas, and New Year’s orders?

  • Order pick-up dates for the Hanukkah Menu are Friday 12/23 – Monday 1/1
  • Web pre-ordering for the Hanukkah Menu ends Sunday 12/22 at 5pm
  • Order pick-up dates for Christmas are Friday 12/16 – Saturday 12/24 (We’re closed Christmas Day, we’re closed!)
  • Web pre-ordering for the Christmas Menu ends Friday 12/23 at 4pm
  • Orders for turkeys and geese are taken until we sell out – we will sell out of specific sizes and types, so get your orders in sooner rather than later!
  • A 24-hour pick-up window will apply for all orders (so keep in mind you can’t place an order on Friday 12/20 at 9pm for Saturday 12/21 10am pick-up).

How do I go about picking up my December Holiday order?
You can choose which Market (18th or Divisadero), and specify your pick-up date and time during the checkout process on shop.biritemarket.com or over the phone.

If I ordered something for Tuesday and can’t make it till Wednesday, is that ok? What do I need to do?
No problem! Simply log into your account on shop.biritemarket.com and update your preorder with the new date.

crabscape_verticalwebI want to feel like a real deal Californian this year, so can y’all help me get my crab game on point? Is California Dungeness Crab even safe to eat? I heard some rumblings about toxic sludge…
California Dungeness Crab season is here and gosh, they are beautiful! After a sad crab-less season last year, we’ve got sweet, succulent, and meaty crabs this time around and we’re so ready to make the most of it. Get ‘em whole or get ‘em cracked and cleaned so all you need to do is melt the butter, bring out the good bread and wine and you’ve got a proper feast.

What’s the deal with Prime Rib? I’m equal parts awed and terrified…
We’ve got your back, or rather your rib? We threw together a Black Tie Dinner Kit so you can pair your Prime Rib magnificence with a bright winter salad, some cheesy, truffle-y potatoes, the best confections this side of the Bay, and eat a fairly epic meal without pulling your hair out at 4pm on Christmas Eve.

primeribscape2_webCan you tell me more about this Prime Rib, where/what/how?
Each rib weights about 1.25-2lb and we usually recommend 1lb per person. The beef is hormone/antibiotic free, grass-fed for 18-24 months and then grain-finished. We made a pretty sweet video to walk you through cooking your holiday Prime Rib AND you can find detailed cooking instructions at the markets in handy postcard form, easy!

I want a really good, responsible bird for the holidays, you know? The kind I can take home to my parents and cleans up real nice for Christmas dinner, no argyle involved.
Our BN Ranch Heritage Turkey is the best turkey we know, with intensely flavorful meat and the highest standards of sustainable ranching to its credit. We also have BN Ranch Broad-Breasted Turkeys for folks that want the benefits of a BN Ranch bird but prefer more white meat. Lastly, we have a select number of Mary’s Organic and Free-Range Turkeys – a great, clean bird, at a more affordable price. All of our turkeys are always fresh and never frozen. If Turkeys aren’t your bird of choice, we have Muscovy and Liberty Ducks this year from some of California’s best poultry farmers too. Only responsible, tasty birds in our kitchens!

hannukkah3_webIs there anything better than Brisket? (i.e. can we talk about Brisket for a minute y’all)
There are a few things better than brisket. Namely, leftover breakfast brisket, the undying street cred of a well-made brisket, the memory of that amazing BN Ranch brisket, and tamales with brisket? Let us do the heavy lifting and slow cook that brisket to perfection for you, or you can put on your big kid pants and cook this beauty yourself. Either way, you can’t go wrong with our brisket, we’re not biased or anything.

champscav_webBefore I go on my annual New Year’s juice cleanse and sign myself up for pilates classes I’m destined to skip, I’d like to ring in the New Year like a real champ. Guide me towards tasty success?
What we’re really psyched about is farm-to-table American Caviar and some real good Champagne to wash it down with. Throw it back to the early 2000s with champs and cav! Plus, you know the Markets will be whipping up perfect party bites the week of to round out your meal.

What cheeses can I bring to ugly sweater parties? Trying to step up my cheese game this year to offset this heinous sweater…
For us, the holidays are about celebrating the seasonal Alpine cheeses that our Cheese Buyer works so hard to bring us. The incredibly unique, 250-pound wheel of Slow Food designated Gotthelf Emmentaler – an intense and nutty cheese that puts the industrially-produced emmethalers of the world to shame is a super special, seasonal staff favorite. But really, anything on our Cheese Course has been curated to pair beautifully with a holiday meal, with a fantastic origin story.

What wines do I take to my in-laws’ Christmukkah dinner?
We’ve curated our favorite holiday wines on our e-commerce site but what we’re *most* excited about is our #BiRitePicks wine service! You tell us what you like, what you’re trying to pair with, and we’ll customize a case of bottles that best fit your meal, mood, and maybe even your sun sign. A personal sommelier service, just for you #becauseyoureworthit.

creameryscape1_webI’ve got a sweet tooth and I’d like to spend the holidays giving everybody I love some really worthwhile cavities, what’ve you got for me?
Swanky Buche de Noel (complete with sugar plum fairies), nostalgic cookies, from-scratch confections in really cute tins, AND rumor has it we’ve got the best candy cane ice cream in all the land. We’re here to give you the sugar high of the year.

I like flowers, and wreaths, and centerpieces, and every time I check out Bi-Rite’s Instagram feed I am filled with floral envy. What’s your holiday floral situation?
We know, our Californian farm-direct flowers are pretty dreamy and have a rabid Instagram following of their own; we can take very little credit. However, you should gift your friends, family, and ugly sweater party hosts our flower bouquets, centerpieces or our gorgeous dried kitchen bouquets (and take all the credit). We’re here to make you look good, fear not.

gifty04webOkay so GIFTS. I have a lot of humans that I care about, and a lot of impressive gifts to give, but very few impressive gifting ideas. What do I do?
Luck you, we’re rather good at impressive gifting. Our Holiday Gift Guide is here to find the food gifts for everyone in your life and their aunties. Or visit the Markets, and our gifting experts will help you with everything from stocking stuffers to serious swag.

What about my boss? Or my coworkers? I work at a really cool non-profit/run a small business/hang out at the Googleplex and would like to win at the corporate gifting game this time around. No more gold embossed planners, please and thank you.
We’re with you and we’re all about winning at corporate gifting. Our Good Food gift boxes are a curated box of the very best of local, artisanal, craft foods, and a pretty fantastic way to show your appreciation to clients, coworkers, and bosses. Trust us.

toydrive02_webHow does Bi-Rite give back to the community during the holidays? How can we give joy and give back to our community this Holiday season?
Supporting our community is a year-round pillar of our business. Every time you shop with us, you are helping us make a difference by empowering our youth, strengthening the community, and creating resilience. This Holiday season, you can help us by donating new and unused toys, books, and art supplies to our fifth annual Toy Drive!

I have a lot more questions that this blogpost doesn’t even begin to cover, can we chat?
Of course! Contact us at shop.biritemarket.com/contact-us or call us at the markets!


Jon Fancey

Cheese Trek Travelogue: Pedrozo Dairy & Cheese, Sacramento Valley, CA

 

cheesetrek02October is American Cheese Month and we’re celebrating by featuring a California original for our 11th Bi-Rite Cheese Trek! Black Butte Reserve is the flagship cheese of Pedrozo Dairy & Cheese – a farmstead creamery in the Sacramento Valley.  Tim Pedrozo, a third generation dairy farmer, started making cheese after purchasing a farm & creamery in 1998.  After learning the craft of cheese making from the original owners, the Pedrozo Family developed their own style of farmstead cheese that showcases the great milk from their herd.  The Pedrozos herd grazes on pasture grasses all year long and they are never fed grains.  This practice leads to exceptional milk and delicious cheese.

cheesetrek06Black Butte Reserve is only made during the spring – when the grass in the pasture is exceptional. The wheels are matured for at least 6 months on the farm to make sure they develop rich & robust flavors that are sharp, grassy, and nutty.  It’s the perfect cheese for the season, pairing beautifully with local heirloom apples and stronger beers.  Black Butte melts perfectly too, so it’s perfect for grilled cheese or fondue.

Black Butte Reserve will be our Cheese Trek feature for the whole month of October. Our next stop in November will take us to Switzerland for a cheese that’s been recognized by the Slow Food Foundation as the most authentic example of one of Europe’s most ubiquitous cheeses. #cheeseyourownadventure!

 


Jon Fancey

Cheese Trek Travelogue: Queseria El Gazul, Acala de los Gazules, Spain!

CheeseTrek9The ninth stop on the Bi-Rite Cheese Trek takes us to a small town in the province of Cadiz, Spain – only an hour drive from the very Southern tip of the Iberian Peninsula. A region known for its many culinary traditions – cured hams, olive oil, cold soups and incredible sherry! Fresh and brined cheeses are the everyday fare in most regions this far south where cheese is not traditionally matured due to the warmer climates.  However, there are a few exceptions, of which Payoyo Curado is one.

CheeseTrek91Payoyo Curado is a small wheel of cheese crafted by master cheesemaker Jorge Puerto at Quesería El Gazul. He uses organic milk from the celebrated and rare Payoya goat.  Payoya are indigenous to this region and thrive in the rocky and shrubby landscape.  At one point they were almost extinct but have since been tended to, bred, and documented much like the famous Iberico pig.

Whilst visiting a Manchego producer in Spain, I had the opportunity to check out a wonderful new cheese shop in Madrid. Always on the hunt for cheeses that I’ve never tasted, this shop was a treat, with selections mainly from the northern regions of Spain.  I was offered a taste of Payoyo, the ‘rarest’ cheese in their selection from the far South.  The texture was dense and the flavors were gentle, yet assertive, like no other goat cheese I had tasted before.  It has taken a few months to arrange for us to offer Payoyo as part of our Cheese Trek, but we’re so excited to finally have these very unique wheels!

Enjoy it with a simple meal of our 25-09-2009. ALCALç DE LOS GAZULES. CçDIZ. QUSOS EL GAZUL./ ROMçN RêOS.house made gazpacho and crusty bread. It also pairs beautifully with slices of Jamon Iberico and a drizzle of fine olive oil.  It’s one of the few aged goat cheeses that I would pair with red wine; an easy drinking Rioja would be best.  A glass of sherry would also be lovely if enjoying Payoyo after a meal.

The next stop on the Bi-Rite Cheese Trek takes us to a chalet on the border of Germany and Austria for a one of a kind alpine treat. As a reminder, this will be the tenth cheese on our Trek and the first opportunity to claim the Cheese Trek tote bag with a fully punched passport.  If you don’t have your passport, ask a Bi-Rite monger for one and join our journey as we #cheeseyourownadventure.


Jon Fancey

Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese!

We’re celebrating two of our favorite local cheeses for August and September – Fresh Mozzarella and Toma from Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese! Most Bay Area folks are familiar with their award winning blue cheeses – but Point Reyes also crafts great cow’s milk cheeses that are perfect to enjoy every day.

The Giacomini Family has been operating a dairy farm just outside of Point Reyes Station for generations now and their 500 Holstein cows graze on the rolling green hills that overlook Tomales Bay.  Delicious, high quality milk from these cows is the not-so-secret ingredient of Point Reyes Farmstead cheeses – whether it’s a ball of milky fresh mozzarella or a wedge of buttery Toma. 

We’ve got plenty of suggestions of how to enjoy and pair these two cheeses for any occasion! Be sure to stop by the Markets and ask a Monger for a taste!

PointReyes_2016_Mozarella-frontPointReyes_2016_Mozarella-back

PointReyes_2016_Toma-backPointReyes_2016_Toma-front

 

 

 

 

 


Jon Fancey

Cheese Trek Travelogue: Twig Farm Tomme, West Cornwall, Vermont

TwigFarmTomme The eighth stop on the Bi-Rite Cheese Trek takes us to a small 40 acre farm just south of Middlebury, Vermont. Michael Lee and Emily Sunderman started Twig Farm in 2005 where they now milk 50 goats & make a handful of seasonal cheeses.  Michael was no stranger to cheese; he managed Formaggio Kitchen in Boston, one of the finest cheese shops in the country.  He honed his cheese making skills by apprenticing and experimenting and now, over a decade later, he crafts some of the most celebrated farmstead goat’s milk cheeses in the United States.

Twig Farm’s herd of alpine goats live outside on the pasture, grazing & browsing about the farm. They are fed organic hay when there’s nothing to eat TwigFarmTomme1outside.  Their milk is used to make Twig Farm Tomme– the farm’s signature cheese.  A small cylinder aged for 80 days with a beautiful natural rind, the rustic cheese has pleasant flavors of herbs & grass below the earthy notes from the rind.

Most Twig Farm cheeses are sold at nearby Famer’s Markets or reserved for cheese shops in Boston & New York. We’re really pleased to offer this seasonal stunner and encourage you to enjoy the cheese with hard cider, heirloom apples, or a pear preserve.

The next stop on our Cheese Trek takes us to the southern tip of Spain for another farmstead cheese from one of the rarest breeds of goats – available in the Markets on September 7th! Be sure to ask our mongers how you can join the Trek and #cheeseyourownadventure!


Jon Fancey

Cheese Trek Travelogue: Comté Reservation from Saint Antoine, France

Comte1The seventh stop on the Bi-Rite Cheese Trek takes us to Marcel Petite’s famed cellars of the Fort Saint Antoine, the one and only ‘Cathedral of Comté’.  Comté is one of France’s most ubiquitous cheeses: it’s eaten at breakfast, lunch, and dinner.  It’s produced by cooperative dairies in the Jura, a mountainous region on the border of France and Switzerland.  Strict guidelines are followed during the production of Comté – regulations that are rooted in heritage and tradition.  Only milk from two breeds of cows are used to produce Comté, Montbéliarde, and French Simmental.  The milk from these beautiful cows is the basis for great cheese, along with the traditional production methods, and the careful maturation.

I had the opportunity to spend a few days in the Jura a couple of months ago and truly experience Comté – the most memorable moments spent tasting and selecting cheese at the most famed aging facility.  The Fort Saint Antoine is a defunct military fortress in the forest of Haut Dobbs.  The altitude of 3,600 feet, the stone walls, and the earth sheltering provide an ideal environment to mature 80 pound wheels of cheese.  Over 100,000 wheels of Comté are aged at the Fort, and each is Comtetasted and graded by the experts at Marcel Petite.  It was quite an experience to walk through the cavernous Fort surrounded by cheese with a Master Selector and a daunting task to select one wheel for our Cheese Trek.

I was looking for a mature wheel, one that was at least 20 months old.  I prefer Comté with deep flavors (think roasted onions, toasted nuts, brown butter, fried bacon).  After tasting several wheels, I settled on one that was deep inside the Fort that is one of the most pleasurable wheels of Comté I’ve tasted.  I’m even more pleased to be able to share this hand selected wheel of cheese with you. It’s a once in a lifetime experience!

I encourage you to savor this cheese on it’s own, and have our wine team suggest a special bottle of wine from the Jura to pair with it.

The next stop on our Bi-Rite Cheese Trek is a very special farm in Western Vermont for a goat tomme that only makes a brief seasonal appearance – it will be available in the Markets on August 19th! Be sure to ask our mongers how you can join the Trek and #cheeseyourownadventure!


Jon Fancey

Cheese Trek Travelogue: Morrow from Mount Gildead, Ohio

MorrowThe sixth stop on the Bi-Rite Cheese Trek take us to my home state of Ohio.  Many things come to mind when the Buckeye State is mentioned, and fine sheep’s milk cheeses are not on the list.  My mom was the first person to mention Kokoborrego Cheese to me – she noticed their stand at her local farmer’s market and asked me if I had ever heard of them.  I had not. Most cheese made in Ohio comes from large cheese plants or very small artisan producers, and none of it really makes its way here to California.

Kokoborrego Cheese is one part of Sippel Family Farm, a 77 acre organic farm in North Central Ohio.  Ben and Lisa Sippel grow organic vegetables and apples, and raise sheep on pasture.  Ben and Lisa purchased the farm in 2004 when they were only 23 years old, and they’ve been making cheese for a handful of years with the assistance of cheese maker Ben Baldwin.

Morrow2Ben mainly focuses on crafting rustic tomme-style cheeses with raw sheep’s milk – sturdy cheeses that can be matured and sold throughout the year.  Morrow is the youngest cheese he makes: a small cube of dense sheep’s milk cheese that’s been dusted with ash.  It develops a light, bloomy rind after a week; the flavors are fruity and sweet with notes of green garlic and grass.  Morrow is Kokoborrego’s most sought after seasonal cheese – they only make it for a couple of months during the summer.  Enjoy it with a glass of sparkling wine on a warm summer day.

Up next on our Cheese Trek is a visit to the ‘Catherdral of Comté’ to select a very special wheel of cheese that will be available in the Markets the first week of August!


Jon Fancey

Cheese Trek Travelogue: Schapenboerderij De Zeekraal from Terschelling, Holland

The fifth stop on the Bi-Rite Cheese Trek takes us Terschelling, one of the Frisian Islands off the northern coast of Holland.  I recently had the opportunity to spend a few days in Holland visiting farms and enjoying great cheese.  My hosts were Betty and Martin Koster, the owners of Amersterdam’s Fromagerie L’Amuse.  The Kosters select and mature Dutch cheeses which they either sell in their shops or export.  Their L’Amuse Signature Gouda is a mainstay at Bi-Rite, but their selection and passion goes beyond aged cow’s milk Gouda.  Betty was excited to take me to Terschelling to visit one of Holland’s most inspiring farmhouse sheep’s milk cheesemakers.

Terschelling1Our day started with a drive from Amsterdam to the port town of Harlingen, where we boarded a boat for a windy and rainy crossing of the Wadden Sea.  When we finally arrived at Terschelling, we were greeted by Jolanda and Gerben Bakker of Schapenboerderij De Zeekraal.  Gerben grew up on the island and now spends his days milking sheep and maintaining an organic farm; his wife, Jolanda, makes cheese and ice cream with the milk and runs a charming farm shop on their property.  We made it to the Baaker’s farm just in time to see their 200 Frisian sheep being milked for the evening and we also spent quite a bit of time with the new born lambs out in the pasture.  We enjoyed the couple’s cheeses for dinner and were treated to an off-road excursion to the eastern tip of the thin island to watch the sunset (at 10pm!).  After spending the night in yurts on the farm, we woke to the sounds of the animals and cups of coffee with fresh sheep’s milk.

TerschellingJolanda is one of only three cheesemakers on the island – and the only one using organic milk.  Her signature cheese is a small wheel of sheep’s milk gouda named for the island.  I first tried this cheese a few years ago and was intrigued by its rich flavors of nuts and caramel that accompanied its smooth & dense texture – the wheel I tasted from had been selected by the Kosters and matured to export to the United States.  I appreciate the cheese even more after visting the Baakers and tasting younger wheels of their cheese on their farm – Terschelling is a unique cheese that reflects the commitment this couple has to their animals and land.  I recommended enjoying the cheese on its own encounter all the complex flavors.  Betty Koster is also passionate about tea and encouraged me to enjoy her selections with Jasmine Tea – the pairing was unexpectedly wonderful.

The next destination on our Bi-Rite Cheese Trek is my home state of Ohio for a taste of an extra-special seasonal sheep’s milk delight!


Jon Fancey

Cheese Travelogue: Condor’s Ruin from Chattahoochee Hills, Georgia

CondorsRuin1The fourth stop on the Bi-Rite Cheese Trek takes us to a newer farm in Chattahoochee Hills Country – a swath of undeveloped Georgia countryside that’s a short drive from Atlanta.  This area is the last rural area near Atlanta to prevent suburban sprawl with the hopes of preserving the natural beauty and agricultural traditions of the region.

Ross and Rebecca Williams started Many Fold Farm in 2009 with an ambitious mission to craft meat and cheese products on a piece of land that adhered to natural systems, while also educating the public about sustainable farming in the South.  200 sheep and 800 chickens live on Many Fold Farm – ewes are milked to produce cheese, lambs are slaughtered for meat, and the hen’s eggs are sold at the nearby farmers’ markets.

I first tried Many Folds Farm cheeses while at a conference three summers ago and they definitely stood out from other cheeses I tried that week.  There aren’t many cheeses made in the South, let alone French-inspired small format sheep’s milk cheeses.  Ross and Rebecca also stood out as a couple – they were young, energetic, and engaging.

CondorsRuinFarmersIt has taken a couple of years for Many Folds to increase their production and meet demand for their unique cheeses; they are just now beginning to appear on the West CoastCondor’s Ruin is my favorite from Many Fold – a delicate sheep’s milk cheese inspired by the French classic Valençay.  The ash coated pyramid develops a beautiful white rind along with well-balanced lactic flavors with notes of grass & garlic.  This impressive effort speaks to the quality of the sheep’s milk and the care given during the cheese making process.  The velvety and dense paste of Condor’s Ruin is best enjoyed with a dry white wine or a complex sparkling wine.

The next stop on our Cheese Trek takes us to an island off the coast Friesland for one of Holland’s rarest farmhouse cheeses that will be available in the Markets on July 7th. Ask our mongers how you can join the Cheese Trek and #cheeseyourownadventure!


Jon Fancey

Cheese Trek Travelogue: Alp Blossom from Doren, Austria

The third stop on our cheese journey takes us to the small village of Doren in Austria’s Bregenz Forest.  Doren lies in the Alpine region where the corners of Austria, Germany, and Switzerland meet – a region known for aged cow’s milk cheeses.

AlpBlossomCheeseMakingStudents

Cheesemaking students at Sennerei Huban

Sennerei Huban was founded in 1901 as Austria’s first cheese vocational school and sources milk from a cooperative of 34 dairy farms.  The cooperative members have 15 cows on average, mainly Brown Swiss, that are on pasture all summer and are fed alpine hay when there’s snow on the ground.  The dairy mainly makes cheeses that are consumed in the region – their production is focused on Emmentaler and Bergkäse.  Alp Blossom is the dairy’s most special cheese, an aged wheel of cow’s milk cheese coated in herbs and flowers from the region.  This style of cheese is seasonally available in Bavaria and the Bregenz but is rarely exported.

AlpBlossom

Maker: Sennerei Huban – Doren, Austria

I discovered this beautiful cheese while attending Slow Food’s Biennial Cheese Festival in Bra, Italy.  It was a warm day in the middle of last September and I bumped into Norbert Sieghart, the exporter of Alp Blossom.  Norbert selects the best cheeses from the Bavarian and Austrian Alps and operates some of the best cheese stalls in Berlin’s Market Halls.  Norbert promised me cold beer and tastes of several of his newest cheese finds.  Alp Blossom stood out more than any offering at his booth – the blanket of purple and yellow flowers really grabbed my attention.  The paste of the cheese was silky smooth and the flavors were long and rich.  The coating of flowers and herbs not only made the cheese visually stunning, they imparted an herbaceous essence to the paste.

It’s been over 8 months since I first tasted this cheese and am excited I was able to secure a few wheels for our Cheese Trek adventure.  I’d recommend enjoying Alp Blossom with any Bavarian beer – I first tasted the cheese while drinking a Pilsner.  A bottle of Riesling would be great, too, as Rieslings always pair well with aged cow’s milk cheeses from the Alps.

The next stop on our Cheese Trek is the Chattahoochee Hill Country of Georgia for one of the most coveted sheep’s milk cheeses being crafted in America.  Look for this next exciting cheese on the Market’s shelves on June 23rd. Visit the Markets and talk to a cheese monger to see how you can join the Cheese Trek and #cheeseyourownadventure today!