Home Archive by category 'Eat Good Food'

Archive for the ‘Eat Good Food’ Category


Raph

New Nana Joe’s Chef’s Blend–Featuring Sam Mogannam!

Local granola producer Michelle Pusateri of Nana Joe’s is a great friends of ours, and she makes wonderful products that we really love and are huge favorites of our guests.  Based here in San Francisco, Michelle exemplifies the small, hands-on, community-oriented approach that we admire when producing her outstanding granola. We’ve been stocking Nana Joe’s since they first opened their doors, so we’re very excited to have collaborated with Michelle in a new way to produce a great new granola.

Nana Joe's michelle

Michelle of Nana Joe’s

Each month, Michelle collaborates with a San Francisco chef to create a special Chef’s Blend Granola. She’s already worked with some of the best chefs in San Francisco, and now we can add our very own Sam Mogannam to that list. Sam is not just the founder of Bi-Rite Market, he’s also my brother! He’s also a fixture in and passionate supporter of the local food community, and a mentor for budding food entrepreneurs. Before founding Bi-Rite, Sam was a chef at his own restaurant, and co-author of Eat Good Food, the grocery buyer’s guide that is available on the shelves at our Markets.

sam_guide

Sam Mogannam

We’re honored to have Sam join the distinguished ranks of San Francisco chefs who have created granola recipes for Nana Joe’s Chef’s Blends. We’re thankful to count Michelle and the crew at Nana Joe’s as friends and grateful that we get to stock their granola on our shelves. Says Sam, “I wanted to work with Nana Joe’s because I know the quality and integrity of the final product is guaranteed to be GOOD. The ingredients I chose are an inspiration from my Mother and a blend of my favorite Mediterranean flavors. Enjoy!”

Nana Joe's shelf

Sam’s granola recipe includes certified gluten-free oats, along with the following organic ingredients: toasted almonds, Grade B maple syrup, extra virgin olive oil, dried apricots, Medjool dates, toasted sesame seeds, crystalized ginger, fennel pollen and Maldon Sea Salt.

Sam’s Chef’s Blend will only be available temporarily, so make sure to get some soon. You can pick it up at either of our Markets. It’s not to be missed!


Chili

Heritage Foods USA: Providers of Our Rare and Heritage Breed Pork

I’m proud of all of the beautiful, truly special and delicious, sustainably-raised meat in our Butcher cases at Bi-Rite 18th Street and Bi-Rite Divisadero. The cases themselves, and our amazing Deli and Butcher staff who stand behind them, are the hearts of our stores.

redwattle_piglet

a Heritage Red Wattle piglet and a friend

Our cases feature meat from suppliers we know and trust, and one of my favorites is the great folks at Heritage Foods USA. Heritage is a meat distributor that provides us with center-cut pork chops, Porterhouse pork chops, boneless pork chops (great pan-seared with roasted fingerling potatoes for the perfect cold-weather dinner), St. Louis-style pork ribs, smoked hamhocks (an essential component for making the perfect split-pea soup) and slab bacon. These products are exceptional because of the thought and care that Heritage puts into their operation from top to bottom.

duroc_pig

a Heritage Duroc pig

Heritage understands the value of preserving rare and heritage breeds. Factory farming places a dangerous emphasis on cheaper breed uniformity, and the hands-on care that family farms take in raising rare and heritage breeds results in animals that live healthier, happier lives and produce really flavorful cuts of meat. I love that these are not commodity animals; they’re no longer part of our regular food system because they’re neither easy nor efficient to raise. They’re nothing like what you would buy from a chain grocery store. This ultimately produces a safer food supply, since breed diversity helps buttress the supply chain against novel pathogens that can sometimes wipe out whole breeds and lead to food shortages.

I also like that I have a truly personal relationship with Heritage. None of the animals we sell are butchered until I place an order. And I can be sure that the animals are being cared for and slaughtered humanely, because I’ve personally visited four family farms with whom Heritage works, as well as the processing facility that handles the animals. Since I’m the last step in the chain before the meat gets onto your table, I like to know exactly what takes place at every step behind me, and Heritage have always been supportive in showing me how their operation runs. The farms they work with are small, run by families across generations: hard-working individuals committed to producing pork that’s miles above the supermarket options that get marketed as “the other white meat.”

goat_grazing

Heritage animals feed and mate naturally at their own pace

Heritage believes firmly in the value of allowing their animals to feed and mate naturally. They support family farms that don’t use artificial growth hormones or antibiotics. Heritage does the kind of business we love at Bi-Rite–the kind that supports communities, nurtures a stable and bountiful food supply chain and produces great-tasting food.

You can use Heritage pork to make this great recipe from the book by Bi-Rite Founder Sam Mogannam, Eat Good Food. Come by either of our Market locations to get everything you need for this recipe!

Pan-Fried Pork Cutlets with Bing Cherries (serves 2)

¾ cup Bing Cherries (about 18 cherries)

6 center-cut, ½-inch-thick boneless pork chops (aka cutlets, about 14 ounces total)

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1 large shallot, thinly sliced

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

1 tablespoon cider or red wine vinegar

½ teaspoon Dijon mustard

¼ teaspoon finely chopped fresh sage

1 cup salt-free chicken stock or salt-free broth (see Note)

Pit the cherries and cut half of them in half. Set aside.

Season the pork with ¾ teaspoon salt and a few grinds of black pepper and let come to room temperature.

Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add as many pork chops as will fit in a roomy single layer and let cook undisturbed for 2 minutes. When the first side is golden brown, flip and cook until just firm and cooked through, 2 to 3 minutes longer. Transfer the pork to a plate, cover loosely with foil, and repeat with any remaining chops.

Lower the heat to medium and add the shallot and half the butter. Cook, stirring frequently, until the shallots start to soften, about 1 minute. Add the vinegar, Dijon, sage and a good pinch of salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until the shallots are soft and the pan is almost dry. Add the stock along with any juices that have accumulated under the cutlets. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil. Add the cherries and cook, stirring occasionally, until the liquid has reduced to one-fourth of its original volume, 3 to 4 minutes.

Remove from the heat, season with more salt if desired, and swirl in the remaining half of the butter. Pour the sauce over the chops and serve immediately.


Announcing the Good Food Awards Finalists…Our PUBLIC Label Kohlrabi Kraut included!

Aren’t we fortunate? The Good Food Awards team announced this year’s finalists and not only does the list includes our own PUBLIC Label Kohlrabi Kraut, but we’re proud to stock about 15 of the other finalists on our shelves! Hmmm, now I’m thinking how cool it would be to gift a bag of all of these for the holidays….here’s the full list of finalists you can find on our shelves:

Pickles

Bi-Rite Market PUBLIC Label Kohlrabi Kraut

Emmy’s Pickles and Jams Bread n’ Butter

Charcuterie

La Quercia Borsellino Dry Sausage

Chocolate

Askinosie Chocolate Dark Milk Chocolate Bar + Fleur de Sel

Dandelion Chocolate Dominican Republic 70% & Madagascar 70% & Venezuela 70%

Lillie Belle Farms Most Awesome Chocolate Bar EVER

Rogue Chocolatier Hispaniola & Sambirano

Coffee

Sightglass Coffee Ethiopia – Yukro Gera

Preserves

INNA Jam Pretty Spicy Fresno Chili Jam

Sosu Srirachup

Cheese

Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese, Petit Frere

Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., Bay Blue

Uplands Cheese Company, Pleasant Ridge Reserve

Beer

Bear Republic Brewery, Racer 5 IPA

View the full list of 2013 Good Food Awards Finalists here. 

Finalists are those entrants that rise to the top in the Blind Tasting and are also able to clearly articulate how they fit the Good Food Awards industry-specific criteria of environmental and social responsibility. Finalists attested to responsible production by detailing their efforts to eliminate or reduce pesticides, herbicides and chemical fertilizers, source ingredients locally where possible, implement water and energy conservation, ensure traceability to the farm level, practice good animal husbandry and exercise fair and transparent treatment of workers and suppliers.

This year’s 182 Finalists were chosen from among 1,366 entries from 31 states in nine industries. In geographic trends this year, Washington, D.C. is emerging as a hub of Good Food, with 14 Finalists hailing from its food shed of Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. Colorado (10), Washington state (10), Wisconsin (9) and Texas (9) all had strong showings. California had the largest number of finalists (43), followed by Oregon (22) and New York (16).

The Good Food Awards celebrate the kind of food we all want to eat: tasty, authentic and responsibly produced. For a long time, certifications for responsible food production and awards for superior taste have remained distinct—one honors social and environmental responsibility, while the other celebrates flavor. The Good Food Awards recognize that truly good food—the kind that brings people together and builds strong, healthy communities—contains all of these ingredients.

The 100 winners will be announced in a 400-person ceremony at the Ferry Building on January 18, 2013, followed by a 15,000-person Good Food Awards Marketplace on January 19. Winners will sample and sell their winning products at the public Marketplace, which takes place alongside the renowned CUESA Ferry Plaza Farmers Market. Tickets and details will be available at www.goodfoodawards.org in mid-December. See you there!


Shakirah

Calling All Local Santas: Our First 18th St. Holiday Joy Drive

Want to help bring some holiday cheer to Mission families this season? Join us and our fellow 18th Street elves for our first ever 18th Street Joy Drive! We’re collecting toys for Arriba Juntos’ “La Posada” Celebration on December 22, 2012. Arriba Juntos expects 1,500 families for the gifts, food, games, music and hourly piñata breaking this year – we need your support! If you’re down to be local Santa, we’re looking for new and unwrapped

Arriba Juntos staff with last year's gift collection

-toys (for kids 12 and under)
-books
-sports equipment (e.g. basketballs and soccer balls)
-art supplies

You can drop off these goodies in the barrel at the entrance of the Market from December 17th to December 20th, 9AM to 9PM. On the 19th from 4 to 7pm, I’ll be accepting donations in front of the store – swap a toy for some hot cider, Christmas cookies and a high-five!

We’re lucky to have so many great neighbors and we’re hoping to create a happier holiday for families in need. With your help, we’ll make it a bit easier on Santa and his elves this year.

Excited? Have questions? Email me!

La Posada 2011

 


Chili

Do the Turkey Tango: Pre-Order Yours Today!

Can you believe Thanksgiving is just two weeks and two days away!? Are you ready to cook your bird and dig into some cozy fall dishes?

Come by the Market today from 4-7 to taste our roasted BN Ranch Heritage Turkey, along with favorite side dishes on our Thanksgiving Menu (including several veggie-friendly), available for pre-order now. And don’t forget the Creamery’s famous Pumpkin Bundt Cake and pies!

Have you ordered your turkey yet? We have five fresh turkey options available for pre-order–check them out on page nine of our Holiday Guide!

We’re here to help, 9 am – 9 pm every day (call us at 415-241-9760).

And while you still have a couple weeks to plot your course, check out our authoritative guide to making your bird and side dishes shine!


Casey

The Label as Site of Intervention

A visual icon Americans have shopped for for decades

As 18 Reasons’ curator, my mission is to weave together the visual arts with the shopping, eating and cooking experienced in our Market, Creamery, and Farm. In that vein, I’m struck by the opportunity we have this month to begin shifting the visual culture of food shopping from the commercial to the behavioral—public health intervention through design.

In 1955 Berkeley, beat-poet Allen Ginsberg wrote his legendary poem, A Supermarket in California. In it, Ginsberg uses a fictional account of a visit to the supermarket as a metaphor for his dissatisfaction with issues such as economic materialism, domestic life, commodification, and sexual repression. Because I don’t have the space to properly divulge into such issues in this short post, I’d like to focus solely on the poem’s second line and bring its relevance into the present time.

Ginsberg writes, “In my hungry fatigue, and shopping for images, I went into the neon fruit supermarket…”

What a tragic tone he casts—a society grown so estranged from its food sources that it is left to shop for images, simulations of food. But in 2012 a similar statement can be made regarding our grocery shopping habits. Shopping for images, for better or worse, has become the primary way in which many consumers hunt and gather their food today. Removed from the source and reliant on the package, labeling has become one of the main places where we meet the story of our food.

As we walk down the grocery aisles, visual identifiers such as slogans, logos, distinguishable colors, fonts, and buzz words jump off packages in an attempt to grab our attention and increase product sales. We seek Chester the Cheetos Cheetah because he is familiar. We seek words like “natural” and “fresh” because they have subconscious ecological, social, and health-based connotations. Although this detached relationship to our food is unfortunate, and largely caused by the predominantly industrialized food system, this vision-based form of harvesting remains a central part of our grocery shopping experience.

A visual icon we may be able to shop for more often if Prop 37 is passed

But here in California, in 2012, we have an opportunity to reimagine this visual relationship as more than just a marketing strategy, to reimagine our food packages as more than a place for a company to sell consumers its products. The label can become a site of intervention.

Prop 37, the initiative to mandate labeling of genetically modified foods, if passed, affords us this chance. By voting Yes on Prop 37, consumers get one step closer to having full, transparent disclosure regarding their food products.  Voting Yes on Prop 37 does not mean you are casting a vote on whether or not GMOs are good or bad; voting yes simply declares that we as consumers have a right to know how our food is produced. Voting Yes declares that we as consumers crave conscious choice.

The importance of voting with our forks has been stressed, but many times before the food reaches our forks, we must vote with ours eyes at the supermarket. And in order to accurately vote with ours eyes, we must vote at the polls.


Groceries as Communities for Change

It’s been a year since Occupy Oakland. Despite the momentum some might have felt at that time, our communities’ social and economic problems remain. But the movement did illuminate a very important sentiment: People want to have a meaningful role in creating greater social equality and economic resiliency in their communities.

I partnered with Brahm Ahmadi of People’s Grocery last week to submit a piece about how grocers can be a locus for change to the San Francisco Chronicle’s op-ed desk.

Brahm is the founder and CEO of the People’s Community Market, a start-up grocery business in the lower-income neighborhood of West Oakland that faces many of the same challenges seen here in the Mission 20 years ago. Although it has yet to open its doors to the public, People’s Community Market is using a local solution for citizen action – a grassroots community investment campaign. The campaign enables people of all economic backgrounds – including the 99 percent – to actively participate in their local economies by becoming shareholders in this business. This is not a donation. This is real investment, creating community ownership, in a business whose primary purpose is to make a positive impact on the well-being of the community, and bring its shareholders a modest return.

The project is an outgrowth of 10 years of community work by the People’s Grocery. Their campaign, enabling people of all economic backgrounds–including the 99 percent–to actively participate in their local economies by becoming shareholders in this business, needs our help!

Click here to become an investor in People’s Community Market--the sooner they raise the needed capital, the sooner their doors will open and offer healthy food to a neighborhood that now does not have access.


Matt R.

Cooking with Curds: Broiled Polenta with Poached Eggs and Piquillo Pepper Sauce

Me 'modeling' the Caciocavallo

To me, polenta is just fancy grits. And who doesn’t love fancy grits with some eggs? This classic breakfast combination is always hearty and fulfilling. Breakfast is also one of my favorite meals, so I’m always looking for ways to mix up its traditional ingredients to serve at all hours of the day.

This dish takes regular polenta and incorporates Caciocavallo cheese, a stretched curd cheese from Italy with flavors somewhere between provolone and mozzarella. I then let the polenta set up, and cut it into chunks to broil. I top those with peppery arugula, poached eggs, briney Castelvetrano olives, and a savory piquillo pepper sauce that is a snap to make. Breakfast for dinner has never tasted so good.

Broiled Polenta with Poached Eggs and Piquillo Pepper Sauce

Serves 4

For the red pepper sauce:
- 1 cup roasted piquillo peppers (1 10-ounce jar in liquid)
- 1 clove garlic
- 1 small shallot
- 2.5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
- 3.5 tablespoons red wine vinegar
- 1/2 teaspoon salt

For the polenta:
- 8 ounces Caciocavallo cheese, grated
- 1 cup polenta
- 2 cups whole milk
- 2 cups low-sodium vegetable broth
- 1 teaspoon salt
- two handfuls baby arugula, washed and dried
- 8 eggs
- 6 ounces Castelvetrano olives, pitted and sliced
- extra virgin olive oil

Directions:

To make the piquillo pepper sauce
Drain piquillo peppers of their jar liquid and rinse off. In a food processor, combine the peppers, garlic, shallot, extra virgin olive oil, red wine vinegar, and salt. Puree until smooth and set aside. Refrigerate if not using immediately.

To make the polenta
Lightly brush or spray a 9×13 pan with extra virgin olive oil. In a medium pot, combine the milk, broth, and salt. Bring to a gentle boil, stirring occasionally. Once the pot reaches a boil, pour in the polenta in a steady stream, whisking constantly as you pour. Let the pot return to a boil, stirring, and then turn the heat down to a simmer. Stir constantly to avoid having a lumpy polenta. The polenta will thicken gradually and eventually start to pull itself away from the edge of the pot. This could take 30 – 40 minutes, but once this starts to happen, the polenta is done.

Transfer the polenta to your prepared 9×13 pan, gently pat it down into an even layer, and set aside. The polenta can be prepared up to a day in advance and kept covered and refrigerated. If you need to use it immediately, place the pan in the fridge uncovered for about an hour until it is set up to a solid consistency.

Preheat the broiler. Once the polenta is set up, remove it from the fridge and cut it into triangles. Place these on a well oiled baking sheet. Broil for a few minutes (2-3) on one side until brown and crisp and remove from the oven. Flip each over and broil the other side until brown and crisp. You may have to broil these in batches depending on the size and type of your broiler. Set finished polenta triangles aside, covered in foil, until all are ready to serve. Poach the eggs, and lightly toss the arugula in a small amount of extra virgin olive oil. To plate, place two or three polenta triangles on the plate, spoon over some of the piquillo pepper sauce, add a handful of arugula, top with two poached eggs, and sprinkle with olives. Enjoy!

P.S. Sharing recipes and photos of cooking victories is something I do often on my own blog–check it out: www.missionkitchensf.com


Holiday Guide & Menus 2012

Click here to view and print our Holiday Guide! We’re taking pre-orders now, give us a call at 415-241-9760 x 3.

We’re so excited to bring you our first ever Holiday Guide, your one stop shop for a tasty holiday, Bi-Rite style. Inside you’ll find:

-Thanksgiving, Christmas and Hanukkah menus

-Turkey options: pre-order yours today!

-Holiday Wine Blitz details

-Sweet Weeks details

-Catering ideas–platters or full service

-Cheese platter tips and our favorites for the holiday

-Pies, holiday ice cream and other sweets from Bi-Rite Creamery

-Gift ideas: 18 Reasons classes, gift boxes, chocolates, special occasion booze, and more…

-Ordering info and deadlines for holiday pre-orders

 

 


Anne and Kris

Join us Saturday at La Cocina’s Street Food Festival

This Saturday, August 18th, we’re continuing the tradition of joining the biggest street food party San Francisco/California/the United States has ever seen: La Cocina’s San Francisco Street Food Festival.  The annual event is a fundraiser for La Cocina, a non-profit incubator kitchen that works to provide low-income and immigrant entrepreneurs with the resources they need to launch and grow successful food businesses. It’s also a celebration of the entrepreneurial spirit and amazing food of La Cocina’s vendors, informal vendors across the city, food trucks and carts from some of the best restaurants around.

Each year, the San Francisco Street Food Festival seems to grow by leaps and bounds; this year four more blocks have been added to the venue, and special out-of-town guests will be there to bring a taste of their regional flair. If eating the authentic street foods of Malaysia, Mexico, Tokyo without leaving the comforts of home sound good to you, then the SF Street Food Festival is the place to be on August 18th!

So what are we bringing to the party? We’ll be slinging cups of salted caramel ice cream along with watermelon popsicles–come by and say hi, we’ll be set up on Folsom between 23rd and 24th. We’ll also be signing copies of our cookbook, Sweet Cream and Sugar Cones, at the Omnivore Books table on the corner of Folsom & 22nd (so you can make the salted caramel you’re tasting at the festival at home!)

Marcia Gagliardi (aka The Tablehopper) may have said it best: “I want to do a shout-out to Caleb Zigas and his amazing team (and volunteers!) at La Cocina who all work so hard at this, and each year keep making this festival bigger, better, and even more bodacious. We’re being exposed to so many unique things through this event, we are so damn lucky. All while helping so many women-owned businesses get the exposure and support they need.”

WHEN: Saturday, August 18th, 11 am to 7 pm

WHERE: 10 blocks! Folsom St. from 20th to 26th, 21st and 25th from Treat St. to Shotwell St., as well as the Cesar Chavez Elementary School parking lot, Parque de los Ninos Unidos and Jose Coronada Playground, all in the Mission District, San Francisco

ADMISSION: Entrance is free. Bring cash for food or get a passport to save time and money — buy your souvenir passport today

La Cocina’s also upping the ante with other fun activities this weekend that you don’t want to miss:

* NIGHT MARKET: Because two days is not enough–eat and dance the night away at the first-ever Night Market, intended to take us to the nighttime street food scenes of Bangkok, Singapore, and Malaysia.

* “EAT YOUR CART OUT” BRUNCH: Join Top Master contestant Chef Suvir Saran and three time Cochon 555 winner Matt Jennings for a mimosa-soaked brunch at SOMArts. You will also have the chance to get acquainted with La Cocina’s newest program participants, Mariko, Olive and Guadalupe.

* FOOD & ENTREPRENEURSHIP CONFERENCE: August 19th- 20th at SOMArts, La Cocina will welcome current and future food entrepreneurs and policy enthusiasts for a day of workshops and conversations such as “How to Write about Your Own Food” with New York Times columnist John T. Edge and Helen Rosner, online editor of Saveur Magazine.

 

 

 


Good Food Awards: Accepting Entries through August 31st!

Calling all beer, charcuterie, cheese, chocolate, coffee, pickles, preserves, spirits and new this year, confections crafters! The Good Food Awards has launched its third annual call for entries to American food producers–I’m looking at you!

Taking my last year's cheese judging duties seriously!

A blind tasting with Alice Waters, Nell Newman and 130 other judges (including myself and Anthea, our cheese buyer) will determine who is recognized as the Good Food Award winners of 2013.  The catch: everything must be produced in an environmentally and socially responsible manner. The short online entry form and sustainability criteria are available here. The entry fee is $50, which goes to cover the sorting, storing and transporting of an anticipated 1,000 entries.

Annette Moldvaer of Square Mile Coffee - she flew in from London to judge, and is one of the world's top cuppers

All winners are honored at a gala awards ceremony with Alice Waters on January 18th, invited to sell their wares at the 15,000 person Good Food Awards Marketplace on January 19th, and can proudly display the Good Food Awards Seal all year long. Many of last year’s 99 winners also received special placements in Whole Foods Market, Williams Sonoma stores nationwide and independent grocers like ourselves (we’ve carried Emmy’s Pickles and Jams’ Turmeric Cauliflower, Chez Pim’s berry jams, and many more)! Many of the winners were covered in the San Francisco Chronicle, Atlantic Monthly, Washington Post and New York Times. Last year’s winners reported an increase in annual sales that is a strong signal of support for smaller scale food businesses across the country; together they bought about an estimated $800,000 worth of ingredients from sustainable farms, proof of the effect of their combined purchasing power.

Pickles judging

This year I’m extra excited about a new trade association that’s being formed alongside the awards: the Good Food Merchants Guild. Led by the values of transparency, innovation and responsible production, the Merchants Guild is at the frontier of America’s food movement. We’ve signed on as a Founders Circle member of the Guild, because we think it’s so important to find ways to unite, distinguish and connect Good Food businesses across the country. I’ve served as an adviser for the Guild in its start-up phase, and I think the influence of this organization could be huge.

The deadline for submission for a good food award is August 31: enter online at www.goodfoodawards.org today!

Susan, Michael, Linh and Morgan--our chefs put together some killer pork sliders with Good Food Award winning condiments for last year's reception!


 


Mark your calendars: Saturday, September 29th is Party on Block 18!

Every other year, we partner with the other 18th Street food businesses to thank our neighbors for supporting us, and raise money for six local nonprofits.

As with our 2008 and 2010 block parties, 18th Street will be closed off between Dolores and Guerrero to make room for tasty street food (short rib tacos, kati rolls or salted caramel ice cream, anyone?) and a wine and beer garden. Music performances will happen throughout the day, along with a pie baking contest (this year, the judging will take place inside 18 Reasons)! We’re excited to be joined by newcomers to our neighborhood this year, including namu gaji, Izakaya Yuzuki, and Pot and Pantry.

As in the past, all proceeds from the event (including money raised through tickets sales, sponsorship and the pie baking contest) will go directly to a handful of neighborhood non-profits selected by the organizers. This year, the beneficiaries will be 826 Valencia, 18 Reasons, Nextcourse, Buen Dia Family School, Holy Family Day Home and The Women’s Building.

The pie baking contest is for non-professional bakers. Pies will be judged based on flavor and appearance in the following categories: fruit, chocolate, nut and other. Entrants will be chosen on a first come, first served basis, notified via email by September 15th; click here to enter the contest.

Advance food and beverage tickets will be for sale in the weeks before the block party here, at Delfina, Dolores Park Café, Fayes, and Tartine Bakery. A book of 10 costs $20. Click here to buy your tickets online.

Join our Party on Block 18 Facebook page to get updates on menu items and other announcements leading up to the big day.

If you’d like to volunteer that day, or have any questions for the organizers, please drop us a line.

We’re so grateful to the neighborhood that supports all of our businesses day in and day out, and hope that Party on Block 18 is a chance for everyone to come out and celebrate together the relationships that have been formed in our community. The first two block parties were great and we expect this one to be even better, hoping to raise even more money than ever before for the six amazing organizations in our neighborhood that will greatly benefit from
everyone’s help.

See you there!