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Archive for the ‘Recipes’ Category


Jason Rose

Cooking Tips for Holiday Meats and Poultry, and Our House-Made Sides

Christmas is here! To insure that every item on your holiday table is cooked to perfection, here are our tips for cooking a range of meat and poultry main courses, as well as instructions on heating items from our Christmas and New Year’s Menu. If you are still planning your holiday meals, drop by and see us at Bi-Rite Market on 18th or Divisadero and we’re happy to help you find everything you need. We’re open until 5pm today.

Instructions for preparing meet are in .pdf form for easy printing so you can have them on hand in the kitchen while you cook. Just click the links below for guides for prime rib, ham, goose, duck, lamb, and turkey.

PrimeRibHow to Cook Prime Rib

How to Cook Ham

How to Cook Goose

How to Cook Duck

How to Cook Lamb

How to Cook Turkey (Broad-Breasted)
How to Cook Turkey (Heritage)

 

Heating Instructions for items on our Christmas and New Year’s Menu

Soup2Soups:

Microwave: 3 to 5 minutes, or until hot
Stovetop: Pour soup into a saucepan and simmer on low heat, stirring to avoid burning, until hot

MashedPot1Mashed Potatoes/Bourbon Sweet Potato Mash:

Microwave: Medium for 4 to 6 minutes, or until hot
Oven: Place in a shallow, oven-proof dish and heat in a 325 degree oven until hot, about 40 minutes

Stuffing2Stuffing:

Oven: Place in a shallow, oven-proof dish. Dot with slices of butter (optional) to add extra richness and crispness. Bake for 40 minutes to 1 hour, until hot and slightly crispy on top. Microwave cooking is not recommended for stuffing.

Veggies

Brussels Sprouts/Other Vegetable Dishes:

Microwave: 3 to 5 minutes, or until hot
Stovetop: Sauté with butter or olive oil in a large sauté pan until heated through

GravyGravy:

Microwave: 3 to 5 minutes, or until hot
Stovetop: Place in a sauce pan and simmer on low heat, stirring to avoid burning, until hot

 

From all of us at Bi-Rite, we wish you, your family, and friends a very Merry Christmas!

 


Jessie Rogers

Bi-Rite’s 2013 Holiday Guide: Delicious Menus, Unforgettable Gifts, and More for a Perfect Season!

Welcome to the Bi-Rite 2013 Holiday Guide!

Our Chefs and Buyers have perfected our house-made menus and stocked our market shelves with the most exceptional locally-grown, sustainably raised, and artisan-produced products available. We look forward to helping you plan unforgettable meals and find the perfect gifts for everyone on your list.

Happy Holidays!


Cooking with Curds: Radishes à la Français

au3My French host-grandmother blew me away one afternoon many years ago when she appeared at the dinner table with a plate of radishes. She then introduced the simplest of pleasures when she showed me how to eat radishes “à la Français,” which is to say cut, stuffed with sweet cream butter, and then dipped in sea salt. The magical combination of these three ingredients is still something I look forward to every spring!  For a variation on the theme, I’ve made a compound butter with Fourme D’Ambert, one of my favorite blue cheeses, to add a savory zip to sweet cream butter, and create a perfect contrast to crunchy, spicy radishes!

Ingredients

1 stick unsalted butter, softened

4oz Fourme D’Ambert, trimmed of rind

Salt and white pepper to taste

1 bunch radishes (French breakfast are the best for their long shape)

 

Instructions

Add softened butter and Fourme D’Ambert to mixing bowl and mash together with a fork until the butter and the blue cheese are well integrated.

Season with salt and white pepper to taste, and mix again.

Scrape butter into ramekin (or other fun shaped dish) to chill for an hour.

Meanwhile, wash and trim radishes.

With a paring knife, cut an X into the bottom of each radish and serve alongside chilled butter.

Stuff each radish with blue cheese butter in the middle of the X and enjoy!

*****

Au revoir, French Cheese Month….bring on the Belgian and Dutch cheeses we have in store for May!


Moms Deserve More: Surprise her May 12 with an 18 Reasons Class

Done with daffodils? Brunch too boring? Massage a little “meh”?

How about a cooking or gardening class for mom (or for you, so you can cook for her)?

At 18 Reasons, we want people to cook more, so our classes train everyday joes like you and me to cook confidently at home. We want more people to think of cooking as an excuse to gather loved ones and spend some quality time together. These classes are fun, informative, and they make a great gift!

If you know a mom who loves to cook, buy her a seat in one of our classes so she can perfect her buttery tart doughs or up her vegetable prowess. And if your Mom would rather just eat, hone your whisking skills at an 18 Reasons class and give her the gift of home cooking all year long!

Here are some no-fail options for mom or you kids: either way, she’ll be happy!

Wednesday, May 1, 6:30-9PM: Japanese Farm Food

Sample salad you will learn to make with a mandolin at Equipment Essentials on May 13.

Sample salad you will learn to make with a mandolin at Equipment Essentials on May 13.

Sunday, May 12, 4-7PM: Rhubarb Bash

(May 12 is Mother’s Day proper–wouldn’t learning to cook with Mom be an excellent way to spend your evening together?)

Monday May 20, 6:30-8:30PM: Equipment Essentials for the Modern Home Cook

Sunday, June 2, 9, + 16, 4-8PM: Unsung: Neglected Spring Vegetables

Monday, June 10, 6-9PM: Buttery Tart Dough

Our full class list is at www.18reasons.org …. see you soon!


Raph

PUBLIC Label Recipe: Sam’s Kimchi Fried Rice

kimchi shotCome taste our new PUBLIC Label Kimchi this Thursday April 25th at Bi-Rite Divis from 5-7pm!

Great news, fermentation fans! Inspired by an over-abundance of ‘couve tronchuda’ (Portuguese cabbage) at Mariquita Farm, we’ve created our favorite Korean condiment: Bi-Rite PUBLIC Label Kimchi! Farmer Andy at Mariquita is known for growing interesting and elusive European produce varietals; his enthusiasm piqued our interest in this rare and special cabbage. Couve tronchuda has tall, bright green leaves with thick, fleshy white ribs; it’s generally considered sweeter and more tender than your average cabbage. Although traditionally used in the Portuguese soup caldo verde, we decided to go the raw and fermented route.

Our recipe features organic daikon and carrots from Lakeside Farms, giving the kimchi a bit more heft and crunch. The Bi-Rite spin on this banchan classic is crisp and refreshing, with a tangy pop of fresh ginger and a hint of spice. For an easy weeknight meal, dollop atop hotdogs, fold into a spring frittata, or stir into your favorite hot noodle soup.

And for a super adaptable, comforting dish, try your hand at Sam’s Kimchi Fried Rice—makes a great meal by mixing in whatever meats or vegetables are sitting around the fridge!

Cabbage Portuguese

Portuguese Cabbage, one of Andy at Mariquita Farm’s unusual varietals

Sam’s PUBLIC Label Kimchi Fried Rice
Serves 2

Ingredients

2 cups white rice, cooked and cooled

1 cup broccoli florets, roughly chopped and steamed

1/2 cup PUBLIC Label Kimchi, coarsely chopped

2 eggs, beaten with 1 TBSP soy sauce

2 TBSP pure olive oil or other neutral oil

1 tsp sesame oil

Directions

  • Heat sesame oil and olive oil in a large skillet.
  • Add rice and fry until hot.
  • Add kimchi and broccoli, sauté until heated through.
  • Add soy sauce-egg mixture, sauté until eggs set, about 2 minutes.
  • Serve immediately!

Raph

PUBLIC Label Recipes: Marinara & Puttanesca Sauce

Public Label LogoEach time we introduce a new product to our PUBLIC Label line, we like to share recipes that incorporate it into your home cooking. Our new tomato sauces are so versatile on pizzas, in pasta, or however you like to use them–here are just a couple ideas to get you started. Visit our PUBLIC Label page to find out what it means to turn the “private” in “private label” upside down.

Roasted Cauliflower with PUBLIC Label Marinara Sauce

Serves 4 as a side

Ingredients:
1 head cauliflower, broken into florets
1 cup Bi-Rite PUBLIC Label Marinara Sauce
1 cup grated ricotta salata
1 tsp chili pepper flakes
2 tbls Bi-Rite PUBLIC Label Extra Virgin Olive Oil
salt and pepper to taste
2 tbls chopped fresh Italian parsley

Directions:
-Preheat oven to 425 F
-Toss florets with olive oil, chili flakes, salt and pepper.
-Put in baking dish in oven for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally
-Lower temperature to 325 F, stir in Marinara Sauce
-Top with ricotta salata and bake for 10 minutes

birite public label

The PUBLIC Label line keeps growing!

Sicilian Meat Balls with PUBLIC Label Puttanesca Sauce
Serves 4

Ingredients:
1 ½ lbs freshly ground beef
½ cup breadcrumbs
¼ cup whole milk
1 large egg
¾ cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
¼ cup ketchup
2 tbls fresh Italian parsley, chopped
2 large garlic cloves, minced
1 small yellow onion, chopped finely
1 jar PUBLIC Label Puttanesca Sauce
salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
-Put a rack lined with parchment paper in the center of the oven and heat to 375 F
-Mix the breadcrumbs and milk in a large bowl, then set aside for 5 minutes.
-Mash and squeeze the breadcrumbs so that they make a smooth paste.
-Whisk in the eggs.
-Add the Parmigiano, ketchup, herbs, onion, garlic, 2 tsp salt and ½ tsp pepper; stir to blend.
-Break the beef into small chunks and add to the bowl.
-Mix gently but thoroughly; over-mixing will make the meatballs tough and dry.
-When all of the ingredients are evenly combined, use a small ice cream scoop to form 24 balls, placing each on the baking sheet
-Bake for 15 minutes (or internal temp of 120 degrees)
-Warm PUBLIC Label Puttanesca Sauce in heavy saucepan.
-Once the sauce is simmering, drop in the balls and simmer together for 12-15 minutes.
-Sprinkle with a little grated Parmigiano and chopped fresh parsley and serve on their own as an appetizer, or with spaghetti

 

 


Cocktail of the Month: NOPA’s Sunshine Fix

nopa_portrait_for_web

In honor of our opening on Divisadero we asked Yanni Kehagiaras, who runs the bar program at NOPA next door (did you know that Jeff Hanak, co-owner of NOPA, was a high school buddy of Sam’s?) to share one of their cocktail recipes with us. Yanni chose the Sunshine Fix, one of the most popular cocktails on their menu.

Yanni says it’s “straightforward, easy, and delicious. The recipe is equal parts City of London Gin, Aperol, and fresh lemon juice, with a dash of Angostura Bitters…garnished with a grapefruit twist.  So in addition to being a solid cocktail, it’s super easy to make.”

Bonus: It was featured recently on 7×7′s “50 Drinks to Try Before You Die” list!

 

SUNSHINE FIX

1oz City of London gin

1oz Aperol

1oz fresh squeezed lemon juice

1 dash Angostura bitters

Build all ingredients in a mixing glass, shake well with ice, and fine strain into your favorite glass. Express a grapefruit twist over the drink, and drop in. Serve immediately.

 

 

 


18 Reasons Chef Recipe: Samin Nosrat’s Kuku

samin 1Samin is the author of Ciao Samin and teaches Home Ec at 18 Reasons. She is not actually crazy, that’s just the name of the dish!

This herb- and green-laden egg dish is a delicious celebration of spring.  Serve it for Saint Patrick’s Day or on March 21 to celebrate Persian New Year.  All that green goodness is a harbinger of health for the year to come. And if you’re looking for spring cooking guidance, check out our upcoming classes on spring fermentation, Easter & Passover menus, and more!

6 eggs
olive oil
1 large spring onion or two small ones, sliced
1 lb greens (nettles or spinach or a mixture of the two work well), blanched and chopped
1 bunch mint, chopped
1 bunch cilantro, chopped
salt to taste

samin 2Pre-heat oven to 350 if you do not want to flip your Kuku part way through cooking.

Heat a good amount (2 Tbsp) olive oil gently in a cast-iron pan.  Add onions over medium heat, salt well, and cook 5 minutes until tender and translucent.  Let cool slightly.

Meanwhile, beat eggs in large bowl.  Add blanched and chopped greens and the herbs. It will seem like a ridiculous amount of greens, but that is the point.  Add the cooled onions and more salt and mix well.

Re-heat pan over medium-high heat. Add egg mixtures and let cook 7-10 minutes until almost completely set. The middle will still be damp.  Don’t let the bottom burn and adjust heat accordingly.  When kuku is almost completely set you can either slide it onto a plate and then flip it back into the pan to cook the top for 2-3 minutes or you can slide the whole pan unto the pre-heated oven and cook it for 2-3 minutes until set but not too firm.

Serves 8. Kuku is amazing the next day for lunch.


Register Recipe: Aziza’s Meyer Lemon Cocktail

farnoush portraitI feel lucky to live in the Outer Richmond. I know that with the constant fog and cool weather that may sound strange for some, but I love it here. I’m five minutes away from the beach, around the corner from a great Margarita at Tommy’s, nearby stinky tofu at Formosa café…but the best benefit has got to be living two blocks away from Aziza!

We all know about the wonderful Michelin-starred Moroccan food they offer, but what I love most is their wine and cocktail program headed by the talented Farnoush Deylamian. Farnoush’s cocktails revolve around seasonal muddled fruits, vegetables, herbs, and spices. Some ingredients may seem strange at first, like sugar snap pea or wild arugula, but they’re in balance and consistently delicious. I always start my evening there with her Meyer lemon cocktail, consisting of muddled Meyer lemon, brandy, and Cointreau, finished with Prosecco. It’s a great starter to a meal as an aperitif, or delicious with their couscous.  If you can’t make it over to 22nd and Geary to visit Aziza, here’s the recipe straight from Farnoush so you can replicate it at home!

single recipe card

 

 


Ian

Register Recipe: Ramos Gin Fizz

The Botanivore Gin, made with 19 different botanicals including cilantro, coriander, Seville orange, bergamot, and star anise, is part of St. George Spirit's oh-so-giftable three-pack

This one is for my uncle Dale. For the past several years, I have worked on Christmas Eve, then celebrated with good friends and good Champagne. The following morning, I have dragged myself from the comfort of bed into the early cold and driven to my Aunt Sue’s house in Sacramento on Christmas morning. There, I’m greeted not only with hugs and smiles, but also a tall, frothy Ramos Gin Fizz made by Dale. The delightful combination of tart citrus and rich cream get my taste buds primed for breakfast, and the gin eases me into the happy chaos of Christmas with the family. It’s probably not the most traditional of traditions, but neither is our family gathering, and that’s partly what I love about it. Now, when the light gets low and the days are short, I find myself craving not a Hot Toddy but a Gin Fizz…

The Ramos Gin Fizz is one of the most famous cocktails to come out of New Orleans. The use of egg white in the cocktail creates a luscious, creamy texture when shaken, while the orange blossom water adds a beautiful bouquet. It’s traditionally considered a brunch cocktail, although served at a dinner party in a coupe and with a garnish it makes quite an impression. I typically garnish the cocktail with grated nutmeg, which makes it even more seasonally celebratory, although it’s not traditional. Some recipes will also call for vanilla extract, which I don’t use, but adds another tasty layer.

Regardless of recipes and ratios, there are a few things that you must consider when making a Ramos Gin Fizz. First, whenever you make a cocktail with egg white, it is important to dry shake all of the ingredients without ice first, before shaking with the ice. Dry shaking helps to emulsify the egg white with the gin and citrus, and will result in a more creamy and frothy beverage. And second, orange blossom water is very potent; try making the first one with 3 drops and, if you like the flavor, add another drop or two to the next round. As always, play around with the recipe and make it yours.

So here’s to the season, our families and our traditions, whatever they may be. Cheers.

Ramos Gin Fizz

2 oz. St. George Botanivore Gin
.75 oz Heavy Cream
.75 oz Simple Syrup
.5 oz. Lime Juice
.5 oz. Lemon Juice
3-5 drops Orange Blossom Water
1 Egg White

Dry-Shake, then shake with ice, and strain into a chilled Collins glass. Top with 1 oz. club soda. Garnish with grated nutmeg.


Faun

Holiday Turkey Preparation Guide

What follows is our authoritative guide to making your bird and side dishes shine! Included are the following recipes and tips (scroll to the bottom for a printable version):

  • Our Tips for Roasting Heritage Turkeys
  • Recipe for Deconstructed Heritage Turkey with Roast Breast & Braised Legs
  • Recipe for Whole Roast Heritage Turkey
  • Recipe for Traditional Roast Broad-Breasted Turkey
  • Reheating Instructions for Items on our Holiday Menus

Our Tips for Roasting Heritage Turkeys

•    Heritage birds typically have a humped breast bone, and the bird will be somewhat leaner.
•    We recommend that Heritage turkeys not be brined; this ensures the best possible texture, and maintains the natural intense  flavor of these special birds.
•    Let the turkey come to room temperature before roasting.
•    Let the turkey rest for at least 20 minutes prior to slicing. This ensures evenly juicy meat.
•    Because of Heritage turkeys’ unique breast-to-leg ratio, the breast will reach doneness long before the legs and thighs. There are two ways to address this: Either roast the bird whole until the breasts are done, and then finish cooking the legs separately, or remove and braise just the legs and roast the rest of the turkey whole

Recipe for Deconstructed Heritage Turkey with Roast Breast & Braised Legs
As featured in our November 2010 Food & Wine article, “A Farm Fresh Thanksgiving”
We highly recommend this recipe! It’s also great for a traditional broad-breasted turkey.

Ingredients
One 12-20 pound turkey
1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt, plus more for seasoning
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
4 garlic cloves, halved
2 celery ribs, cut into 2-inch lengths
1 carrot, peeled and cut into 2-inch lengths
1 onion, sliced
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 cup dry white wine
6 cups Turkey Stock or low-sodium broth
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
10 sage leaves
12 thyme sprigs
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
Freshly ground pepper

Cut the legs and wings off of the turkey; separate the drumsticks and thighs. Using poultry shears, cut off the backbone. (Reserve the wings, neck and backbone for making stock.) Set the breast, thighs and drumsticks on a rimmed baking sheet and sprinkle all over with the 1 1/2 tablespoons of salt. Cover and refrigerate for at least 8 hours or up to 24 hours.

Rinse the turkey parts and pat dry. In a large enameled cast-iron casserole, heat the olive oil. Add the thighs and drumsticks and cook over moderate heat until well browned all over, about 15 minutes. Transfer the turkey to a platter.

Add the garlic, celery, carrot and onion to the casserole. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables just begin to soften, about 5 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste and cook for 1 minute. Add the wine and cook until reduced by half, about 5 minutes. Return the thighs and drumsticks to the casserole and add 4 cups of the Turkey Stock. Cover and braise over low heat until the turkey is tender, about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Transfer the turkey to the platter; strain the braising liquid and return it to the casserole.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350°. Spread half of the butter under the turkey breast skin; tuck in the sage and thyme. Spread the remaining butter over the skin.

Heat a large ovenproof skillet. Add the turkey breast, skin side down, and cook over moderately high heat until browned, 12 minutes. Turn the breast skin side up and transfer the skillet to the oven. Roast the turkey breast for about 1 hour, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the meat registers 150°. Transfer the breast to a cutting board and let rest for 15 minutes. Add the remaining 2 cups of turkey stock to the skillet and bring to a boil, stirring to scrape up any browned bits on the bottom.

Boil the braising liquid in the casserole until reduced to 3 cups, about 10 minutes. Add the stock from the skillet. In a small bowl, whisk the flour with 1/4 cup of water; whisk this mixture into the liquid in the casserole and boil, whisking frequently, until the gravy is lightly thickened, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Transfer the gravy to a gravy boat.

Remove the bones from the thighs and slice the meat 1/2 inch thick. Transfer the thigh meat to a roasting pan along with the drumsticks. Cover with foil and reheat. Carve the turkey breast and arrange on a platter. Arrange the dark meat alongside; serve with the gravy.

NOTE: If you aren’t comfortable cutting up a turkey, you can prepare this recipe using a 7-pound turkey breast on the bone, plus 5 pounds of turkey drumsticks and/or thighs.

Recipe for Whole Roast Heritage Turkey
Courtesy of Chef Dan Barber of Stone Barns and Blue Hill, NY

 

Ingredients
BN Ranch Heritage Turkey
butter
salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 475 degrees.

Let turkey come to room temperature. Carefully separate skin from the breast meat and rub softened butter on to breast. Season liberally with salt and pepper.

Set the turkey, breast side up, on the rack of a large roasting pan. Tie the legs together with kitchen string. Roast for 20 minutes.

Lower the oven temperature to 350 degrees and cover turkey loosely with tin foil. Roast until the thermometer inserted into the inner thigh registers 150 degrees (2 to 3 hours, depending on turkey size).

Transfer turkey to cutting board. Let stand for at least 45 minutes to cool down. Remove legs and thighs, careful to not take too much skin with you.

Place thighs, skin side, on a roasting pan and continue cooking 40-45 minutes or until juices run clear. Separately slice breast and thigh and plate while still warm.

Recipe for Traditional Broad-Breasted Turkey

After removing neck and giblets from the body cavity, rinse the bird with cold water. Pat cavities and body dry with a paper towel. Rub body and neck cavities with salt if desired, and stuff loosely. Truss neck cavity with metal skewer and truss legs. To remove the truss just lift the ring and pull it up and over the end of the drumstick. To secure the truss, hold the drumsticks together, lift the ring and pull it over the drumsticks.

Spread exterior of turkey with a blend of your favorite herbs and spices or with a paste made of the following ingredients:

4 Tbsp oil (melted butter or olive oil)
4 tsp. salt, or to taste
2 tsp. paprika

Heat oven to 325º F. Place bird in open pan, breast side up. Pour two 8 ounce cups of water in bottom of pan. Place in oven. If roasting turkey unstuffed then decrease roasting time by approximately 30 minutes. There is no need to turn the bird while roasting as it will brown to a rich, golden color. However, a piece of foil should be placed loosely over the breast for the last hour of roasting.

Take the temperature by inserting a meat thermometer in the thigh joint, where the leg connects to the breast; the turkey is done when it reads 155-160°. When done, the thickest part of the drumstick will feel soft. Remove from oven. Let stand 15 minutes before carving.

Weight    Approximate        Time to Start
(lbs)      Roasting Time     Checking Temperature

6-10 lbs.      approx. 2 hrs.          1 ½ hrs.
10-12 lbs      3 – 3 ¼ hrs.            2 ½ hrs.
12-14 lbs.     3 ¼  – 3 ½  hrs.      2 ½ hrs.
14-16 lbs.     3 ½  – 3 ¾  hrs.      2 ¾ hrs.
16-18 lbs.     3 ¾  – 4 hrs.            3 hrs.
18-20 lbs.     4 – 4 ½  hrs.           3 ¼ hrs.
20-22 lbs.     4 ½  – 5 hrs.          3 ¾ hrs.
22-24 lbs.     5 – 5 ½  hrs.          4 hrs.
24-26 lbs.     5 ½  – 5 ¾  hrs.    4 ¾ hrs.

Reheating Instructions for Items on our Holiday Menus

House Roasted Diestel Ranch Turkey Breast
Place turkey in a shallow baking dish and pour ¼ to ½ cup broth over the turkey. Cover with foil and reheat in a 325 degree oven for 40 minutes or until hot

Whole Roasted Diestel Ranch Turkey
Place turkey in a baking pan and cover with foil. Roast at 325 degrees for 1-1/2 to 2 hours until heated thru or to taste.

Soups
Microwave: 3 to 5 minutes, or until hot
Stovetop: Pour soup into a saucepan and simmer on low heat, stirring to avoid burning, until hot.

Mashed Potatoes / Sweet Potato Mash
Microwave: medium for 4 to 6 minutes or until hot
Oven: Place in a shallow, oven proof dish and heat in a 325 degree oven until hot, about 40 minutes

Stuffing
Oven: Place in a shallow, oven proof dish. Dot with sliced of butter (optional) to add extra richness and crispness. Bake for 40 minutes to 1 hour, until hot and slightly crispy on top

Brussels Sprouts and Other Veggies
Microwave: 3 to 5 minutes, or until hot
Stovetop: Sauté with butter or olive oil in a large sauté pan until heated thru

Gravy
Microwave: 3 to 5 minutes, or until hot
Stovetop: Place in a sauce pan and simmer on low heat, stirring to avoid burning, until hot

Printable Guide- page 1 (pdf)

Printable Guide- page 2 (pdf)


Matt R.

Cooking with Curds: Broiled Polenta with Poached Eggs and Piquillo Pepper Sauce

Me 'modeling' the Caciocavallo

To me, polenta is just fancy grits. And who doesn’t love fancy grits with some eggs? This classic breakfast combination is always hearty and fulfilling. Breakfast is also one of my favorite meals, so I’m always looking for ways to mix up its traditional ingredients to serve at all hours of the day.

This dish takes regular polenta and incorporates Caciocavallo cheese, a stretched curd cheese from Italy with flavors somewhere between provolone and mozzarella. I then let the polenta set up, and cut it into chunks to broil. I top those with peppery arugula, poached eggs, briney Castelvetrano olives, and a savory piquillo pepper sauce that is a snap to make. Breakfast for dinner has never tasted so good.

Broiled Polenta with Poached Eggs and Piquillo Pepper Sauce

Serves 4

For the red pepper sauce:
- 1 cup roasted piquillo peppers (1 10-ounce jar in liquid)
- 1 clove garlic
- 1 small shallot
- 2.5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
- 3.5 tablespoons red wine vinegar
- 1/2 teaspoon salt

For the polenta:
- 8 ounces Caciocavallo cheese, grated
- 1 cup polenta
- 2 cups whole milk
- 2 cups low-sodium vegetable broth
- 1 teaspoon salt
- two handfuls baby arugula, washed and dried
- 8 eggs
- 6 ounces Castelvetrano olives, pitted and sliced
- extra virgin olive oil

Directions:

To make the piquillo pepper sauce
Drain piquillo peppers of their jar liquid and rinse off. In a food processor, combine the peppers, garlic, shallot, extra virgin olive oil, red wine vinegar, and salt. Puree until smooth and set aside. Refrigerate if not using immediately.

To make the polenta
Lightly brush or spray a 9×13 pan with extra virgin olive oil. In a medium pot, combine the milk, broth, and salt. Bring to a gentle boil, stirring occasionally. Once the pot reaches a boil, pour in the polenta in a steady stream, whisking constantly as you pour. Let the pot return to a boil, stirring, and then turn the heat down to a simmer. Stir constantly to avoid having a lumpy polenta. The polenta will thicken gradually and eventually start to pull itself away from the edge of the pot. This could take 30 – 40 minutes, but once this starts to happen, the polenta is done.

Transfer the polenta to your prepared 9×13 pan, gently pat it down into an even layer, and set aside. The polenta can be prepared up to a day in advance and kept covered and refrigerated. If you need to use it immediately, place the pan in the fridge uncovered for about an hour until it is set up to a solid consistency.

Preheat the broiler. Once the polenta is set up, remove it from the fridge and cut it into triangles. Place these on a well oiled baking sheet. Broil for a few minutes (2-3) on one side until brown and crisp and remove from the oven. Flip each over and broil the other side until brown and crisp. You may have to broil these in batches depending on the size and type of your broiler. Set finished polenta triangles aside, covered in foil, until all are ready to serve. Poach the eggs, and lightly toss the arugula in a small amount of extra virgin olive oil. To plate, place two or three polenta triangles on the plate, spoon over some of the piquillo pepper sauce, add a handful of arugula, top with two poached eggs, and sprinkle with olives. Enjoy!

P.S. Sharing recipes and photos of cooking victories is something I do often on my own blog–check it out: www.missionkitchensf.com