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Simon

Put A Fig On It!

DSC_0630It’s that perfect point of summer where fig season is really taking off and we’re finding every which way to #PutAFigOnIt!

At Bi-Rite we realize that the best tasting figs are the ones that sit on the tree longer to fully develop their sugars, and are harvested just when the jelly-like flesh of the figs is about to explode out of the skin with sugary goodness. This means never biting into under-ripe, extra-firm, underwhelming figs. Only tree-ripe, mouth-full-of-goodness fruit will do!

The fresh fig selection at the Markets changes every day depending on which varieties our favorite farms are harvesting and delivering to the Markets.

Black Mission Figs are the most common grocery store fig since their thick skin makes them good for shipping long distances. However, if grown to the perfect level of ripeness as they are at Cloverleaf Farm, their dark purple flesh makes them one of the very sweetest varieties. It’s strawberry-colored flesh makes it perfect tossed in an arugula salad or atop pizza where its flavors caramelize and intensify.

Brown Turkey Figs are similar to the Black Mission in appearance, but a little lighter in color with green skin next to the stem. They’re known to be the largest growing fig and have a beautiful rose-colored flesh.

The green fig varietiesAdriatic, Kadota, and Calimyrna bring a lot of excitement to Bi-Rite each season with their lime green skin and beautiful reddish pink flesh. These are usually the some sweetest varieties of the season and a perfect dessert fig.  They’re on the shelves now from Knoll Farm and when wrapped in smoky, salty prosciutto or even bacon, make a stunning appetizer.

Our final and most awaited varietal every year is the Candy Stripe Fig, with bright yellow skin and green stripes – it’s always a Fig_Sign_8ways_8_waysmain attraction in the produce department in late August! The flesh is crimson-colored and they taste like raspberry or strawberry jam. Let’s just say they’re always dressed to impress.

We’ve got handy #PutAFigOnIt signs throughout the markets right now to help you pair your figs with everything from Benton’s Hickory Smoked Bacon, to a rustic Canestrato di Moliterno cheese, to a rich whole milk Ricotta just begging to be slathered onto a crispy baguette.

Get figgy with it at the Markets through September or directly to your doorstep from our online store via Instacart.com!

And if you’re still on the fence about the venerable fig, we loved this wonderful ode to it in the New Yorker, on the history of the botanical world’s most under-appreciated yet essential little fruitLove the Fig.


Jon Fancey

Cheese Trek Travelogue: Twig Farm Tomme, West Cornwall, Vermont

TwigFarmTomme The eighth stop on the Bi-Rite Cheese Trek takes us to a small 40 acre farm just south of Middlebury, Vermont. Michael Lee and Emily Sunderman started Twig Farm in 2005 where they now milk 50 goats & make a handful of seasonal cheeses.  Michael was no stranger to cheese; he managed Formaggio Kitchen in Boston, one of the finest cheese shops in the country.  He honed his cheese making skills by apprenticing and experimenting and now, over a decade later, he crafts some of the most celebrated farmstead goat’s milk cheeses in the United States.

Twig Farm’s herd of alpine goats live outside on the pasture, grazing & browsing about the farm. They are fed organic hay when there’s nothing to eat TwigFarmTomme1outside.  Their milk is used to make Twig Farm Tomme– the farm’s signature cheese.  A small cylinder aged for 80 days with a beautiful natural rind, the rustic cheese has pleasant flavors of herbs & grass below the earthy notes from the rind.

Most Twig Farm cheeses are sold at nearby Famer’s Markets or reserved for cheese shops in Boston & New York. We’re really pleased to offer this seasonal stunner and encourage you to enjoy the cheese with hard cider, heirloom apples, or a pear preserve.

The next stop on our Cheese Trek takes us to the southern tip of Spain for another farmstead cheese from one of the rarest breeds of goats – available in the Markets on September 7th! Be sure to ask our mongers how you can join the Trek and #cheeseyourownadventure!


Trac

A Taste of Spain

Back in May, I went on a buying trip to Spain with a few San Francisco wine buyers and wine directors. We covered a lot of ground, from San Sebastien in the north, east to Rioja, down south to Madrid, and back to up Barcelona. This trip was eye opening and changed my entire perspective on Spanish wines and spirits. I wasn’t aware of how truly diverse the wine regions of Spain are, and how regional are their drinking cultures. Like most, I thought Spain was mainly big oaky wines like you find in Rioja or Priorat, and what are grown are more international varieties like Garnarcha (Grenache) – how wrong I was!

MarcIsartMalvarSpain is very diverse with a long and proud history of wine making, and the more obscure regions and styles are starting to make their way to the U.S. market. I met with Juan Antonio Ponce who is championing Bobal, a red varietal grown in Manchuela, a region just west of Valencia. Bobals are known to produce wines that are similar to Beaujolais, the of-the-moment region of France that sommeliers are falling in love with again. I also met with Marc Isart in Madrid, where he’s making amazing wines from a white varietal called Malvar. This grape is rarely planted anymore and is only made by just a handful of producers.

However, it isn’t all wine in Spain – their spirits culture is alive and thriving. Gin and Tonics are ubiquitous at bars, and there are even establishments dedicated to vermut (Spanish vermouth). I discovered the unique flavors of Spanish brandy, made from sherry wine to give it a nutty counterpart to the normally sweet spirit.

We’re so inspired by this thriving drinking culture, we invite you to make the most of the end of summer (and hopefully warmer SF days soon) with a taste of Spain! Stop in and chat with us – we’re happy to recommend a Spanish tipple for however you like to imbibe. And don’t forget to pair it with a tapas or two…

DSC_0533Wines:
Marc Isart “El Malvar de la olla” Madrid, Spain 2013 | $19.99

Malvar is indigenous to the Iberian Peninsula, and while not known for outstanding quality or distinctive character, Marc Isart is the lone exception. Organic farming and careful fermentation give this wine great charisma and freshness.

Ameztoi Txakolina “Rubentis” Rosato Galicia, Spain 2015 | $21.99
Everyone’s favorite geeky Rosé from Basque Country, this pink sibling of Amestoi’s flagship white is vibrant and a little spritzy. Made from a mixture of white and red grapes, the Rubentis is briny with hints of watermelon and strawberry. Absolutely thirst quenching!

Bodegas Ponce “P.F.” Bobal Manchuela, Spain 2013 | $22.99
P.F. stands for ‘Pie Franco’, roughly translating to ‘on its own feet’ and is a reference to the fact that the vines for this wine are ungrafted – a true rarity, since phylloxera destroyed most vines on old rootstock in Europe. This red is made from a native grape of the region, Bobal, and is aged in old French oak barrels.

Gin:
Xoriguer “Mahón” Gin 1L Menorca, Spain | $49.99
A cult gin from Mahon in Menorca, Xoriguer is one of the only gins in the world (alongside Plymouth) to have a geographical indication, Gin de Menorca. Gin has been made on Menorca since the time of the British occupation in the 18th century, and Xoriguer commands a devoted following of happy travelers. Unusually, Xoriguer is made in wood-fired potstills from distilled wine (eau-de-vie) rather than the more usual grain-based distillate, and is rested in American oak barrels before bottling.

DSC_0571Vermut:
Destilerías Acha Vermouth Blanco Atxa | $19.99
Founded in 1831, Destilerías Acha has been at the forefront of distillation in the Basque Country for years. Acha’s Vermouth Tintois made in accordance with an early 19th-century recipe passed down through the family. It is made from a blend of a neutral wine and alcohol macerated with a selection of traditional herbs, fruits and roots, including wormwood, gentian and cherry.

Brandy:
Navazos-Palazzi 50 Year Old Single Cask Montilla Brandy | $109.99
One of the more unique artisanal brandy producers in the world, Navazos-Palazzi only bottle their brandy from a single cask. This particular one is at least 50 years old  and aged in ex-Oloroso sherry cask. This bottle was bottled in 2013. Masculine and feminine at the same time, this is a sipping on a snapshot of a time long gone and one that will never come again.


Jason Rose

Bi-Rite From Scratch: Because Dinner Matters

dinner_plattersWe know it’s not always easy to find time to cook dinner – between shopping for ingredients, preparing them, and serving them, it’s hard to carve out space in our busy schedules.  That’s why we prepare dinner nightly in the Markets, from scratchBecause dinner matters, and coming around a table to share a meal shouldn’t be work.  Made with the same locally-grown produce, sustainably-raised meats and seafood you find on our shelves, we do the work for you so all you need to do is take pleasure in the eating.

We tweet our dinner specials every day at 4:30pm, so you’ll know what’s in season and ready-to-eat. Plus, we’ll be sharing our favorite #biritelifehacks on social media through the months of August and September so you can have the inside scoop on how to make the most of what we have to offer.

Our chefs share why dinner matters to them:friedfish_dinner_hands

“For me, as a super busy parent that scrambles to put healthy, wholesome food on the table every night, our dinner offerings are true life-saver. Like most professional parents, as soon as we pass through the front door, the timer starts….you’ve only got about 25 to 30 minutes to knock out dinner, which can be tricky even for a seasoned chef. I’ll typically “sub contract” out 25-50% of dinner, as it just saves that much time. There are always 2 to 4 amazing vegetable dishes that I will often times simply fold in some beautiful greens into and call it done.  Aside from the convenience, what’s most important to me is that I know who made my food and where it comes from.  As a parent, knowing and TRUSTING what I’m feeding myself and my family is the most important thing. I’ve been and member of 3 different meal delivery services, but the impersonality of them paired with the fact that most of them do not go into specifics as to where the ingredients came from was enough to turn me off. At Bi-Rite, our dinners change every night, so you’re constantly tasting and discovering new dishes.”
-Jason Rose, Culinary Director

Bi-Rite dinner to me is simply about feeding friends and neighbors. In my opinion, all true cooking is about feeding people, it’s a strange thing that everyone eats yet not everyone cooks. Because of that fact, what we do is extremely personal, intimate, and reaches people in ways that we probably haven’t even considered. It takes a lot of courage to stand behind what we do every day. It’s clearly a great resource to our friends and community to be able to feed them and have them trust us enough to bring our food into their homes to feed them, it’s engaging, honest and again very personal. To be able to eat dinner daily with friends is a true expression of what cooking, community and Bi-Rite stands for. “
-Jeff Amber, Chef of Bi-Rite 18th Street

friedchicken_dinner2This is why we’re in the business, because we love to feed people.  It is amazing to be able to create whatever we want each day – there is literally no limit as to what we can produce for dinner so I look at it like a giant playground. Plus, it feels great knowing that folks are going to go home with quality dinners each night, knowing not only where our product comes from, but the attention and creative touch our chefs gave each dish. All in all our dinners are fairly healthy. I remember the times as a young line cook on a busy Friday night I could pump through about 15 pounds of butter on a saute line! At Bi-Rite we cook with amazing olive oils, produce from our “backyard” (and our very own farm!), cattle that roam freely eating only grass, fish that has been caught from fishermen we know by first name..and so forth.  Our product surpasses majority of our competitors by miles. It feels good to know where your product comes from.  It feels even better to consume it, share it, and love it.
-Jay Abrams, Chef of Bi-Rite Divisadero


Jon Fancey

Cheese Trek Travelogue: Comté Reservation from Saint Antoine, France

Comte1The seventh stop on the Bi-Rite Cheese Trek takes us to Marcel Petite’s famed cellars of the Fort Saint Antoine, the one and only ‘Cathedral of Comté’.  Comté is one of France’s most ubiquitous cheeses: it’s eaten at breakfast, lunch, and dinner.  It’s produced by cooperative dairies in the Jura, a mountainous region on the border of France and Switzerland.  Strict guidelines are followed during the production of Comté – regulations that are rooted in heritage and tradition.  Only milk from two breeds of cows are used to produce Comté, Montbéliarde, and French Simmental.  The milk from these beautiful cows is the basis for great cheese, along with the traditional production methods, and the careful maturation.

I had the opportunity to spend a few days in the Jura a couple of months ago and truly experience Comté – the most memorable moments spent tasting and selecting cheese at the most famed aging facility.  The Fort Saint Antoine is a defunct military fortress in the forest of Haut Dobbs.  The altitude of 3,600 feet, the stone walls, and the earth sheltering provide an ideal environment to mature 80 pound wheels of cheese.  Over 100,000 wheels of Comté are aged at the Fort, and each is Comtetasted and graded by the experts at Marcel Petite.  It was quite an experience to walk through the cavernous Fort surrounded by cheese with a Master Selector and a daunting task to select one wheel for our Cheese Trek.

I was looking for a mature wheel, one that was at least 20 months old.  I prefer Comté with deep flavors (think roasted onions, toasted nuts, brown butter, fried bacon).  After tasting several wheels, I settled on one that was deep inside the Fort that is one of the most pleasurable wheels of Comté I’ve tasted.  I’m even more pleased to be able to share this hand selected wheel of cheese with you. It’s a once in a lifetime experience!

I encourage you to savor this cheese on it’s own, and have our wine team suggest a special bottle of wine from the Jura to pair with it.

The next stop on our Bi-Rite Cheese Trek is a very special farm in Western Vermont for a goat tomme that only makes a brief seasonal appearance – it will be available in the Markets on August 19th! Be sure to ask our mongers how you can join the Trek and #cheeseyourownadventure!


Simon

Late Summer Mouthwatering Melons

Vacation is defiantly the highlight of the summer months; for some of us, fresh-picked summer fruit is a close second.  In June we had fresh local sweet red cherries, July saw big, juicy yellow peaches, and in August mouthwatering melons.   Everyone has a fruit from their childhood that screams summer – for me hands down it’s watermelons! Unfortunately, for most of my youth I only knew watermelons, Cantaloupe, and Honeydew. Luckily at Bi-Rite Markets, we spend a majority of the late-summer months celebrating all the mouthwatering, vine-ripe melons that come from our favorite local farms, with anywhere from 7 to 10 varietals on our shelves at any given time!

OrchidwatermelonFull Belly Farm is nestled in the heart of Yolo County and they grow a wide range of organic veggies, fruit and flowers.  Melons happen to be one crop that they love to grow, and it shows in their flavor and texture.  Each week we order up to 5 different varieties (each with something unique to offer) to share with our guests and let our chefs get creative in the kitchens with their melon salads. The Orchid watermelon makes heads turn: at first glance it looks like your everyday watermelon, but when you crack this bad boy open a bright yellow/orange flesh brightens your day.  It’s a very juicy melon with a sweet sherbet-like flavor.

SharlynwcaptionFor folks who prefer a cantaloupe-like variety give the Sharlyn melon a try. This cantaloupe/ honeydew hybrid has a soft light-orange flesh and nicely balanced sweet/floral flavor.  It will take any fruit salad to the next level of goodness.  The green-fleshed Galia melon is a muskmelon hybrid with a succulent flesh and a sweet tropical flavor.  Full Belly just started harvesting the Canary melon.  The bright yellow skin almost looks like a winter squash, but once you cut it open the pineapple/banana aroma takes over.  The flavor of this melon is a balance of pairs well with ginger, citrus and pretty much all other summer fruit! Sweet/tangy and the crisp flesh!

PielDelSapoHappy Boy Farms located just in the heart of Watsonville is known for their greens and tomatoes, but their melon game has been on point the past five years.  The two melons they are growing right now might be the best of the season and easily the most interesting.  The Piel De Sapo “Toad Skin” melon is football shaped with a bright green-yellow striped skin.  Its visual appearance defiantly stands out, and the extra-sweet and smooth flesh with a little bit of crunch is what makes it a Bi-Rite Staff favorite.  The Charentais melon is a gourmet French variety that’s been farmed for over 100 years.  Usually the size of a grapefruit, the Charentais has a tan-green skin with dark-green seams when perfectly ripe.  Don’t let this melon fool you, the uglier it get the better is tastes.  The aroma that comes off this melon is almost as enjoyable as the rich, sweet flavored orange flesh.  This is the ideal melon to wrap in prosciutto.

The past couple years we’ve even dialed in our melon growing on the Bi-Rite Farm in Sonoma.  Since we work directly with a handful of local farms that grow delightful melons, we’ve decide to grow more unique varieties on our farm.  The Ginkau melon is a small, oval shaped Korean melon with a golden skin and crispy, smooth white flesh.  The Lambkin melon is an early Peil De Sapo variety with very sweet, crisp white flesh.  Later this month will be harvesting the Crane melon which originated in Sonoma County and is a super sweet, fine flavored melon.MelonLineup

How to Pick and Store your Melons:
One of the main reasons we buy our melons straight from local farms is that they let the melons ripen on the vine, and pick them at the prefect level of ripeness. Most of the larger farms grow varieties that can handle being shipped long distances and are harvested early, before the sugars have fully developed.  At the Bi-Rite there’s always a melon that’s ripe and ready to eat.

Picking out the perfect melon can be a challenge. For muskmelons and other specialty varieties, smell the butt-end of the melon were the stem was attached and if it has a sweet and/or floral scent its ready.  Also, when you are looking at a display of specialty melons the ones that have brighter color skin coming are ready (usually the greener skin indicates a less ripe melon).

These techniques do not work for watermelons – it’s much harder to pick a ripe watermelon.  Try tapping on the side of the watermelon and if it sounds hollow when you tap, it’s ready (a not hollow sound usually means it’s unripe).  Your best bet is to ask the produce clerk which watermelon tastes best! If you purchase a melon that is ripe and ready to eat, either take it to the park and eat that moment or take it home and put it in the fridge for a few hours to chill the flesh before you eat it.  When you bring a melon home that is still a bit green, let is sit on the counter at room temp until it ripens up.  If you’re not ready to eat your ripe melon store it in the fridge.  However, watermelons store best at room temp. Cold temperatures can turn the flesh of watermelon to mush!


Chili

Hogust: Heritage Breeds for all Your Needs

Hogust is here and it is definitely one of my favorite times of the year. The celebration perfectly encapsulates our Product Mission and truly highlights why our meat is special and tastes so delicious – because we focus on celebrating craft and heritage, environmental responsibility, genuine relationships and, above all, great taste!

Since 2005, Bi-Rite and Heritage Foods USA have partnered together to support small family farms that are committed to raising unique breeds of hogs with varied flavors and tastes.  All August long we will be highlighting center-cut pork chops from breeds like the Tamworth (lean with incredible tenderness and flavor), Old Spot (creamy and fruity with a high fat ratio), Duroc (well-marbled with nut and olive notes), Large Black (firm yet delicate with sweet and savory flavors), Berkshires (exceptional marbling and umami flavor), and my favorite, the Red Wattle (sweet and buttery with an expressive, porky flavor).

So come visit us in the markets meet our butchers and take advantage of this opportunity to experience pork from the breed perspective.  Be sure to stop by throughout the month to taste the different varieties and find your new favorite. To quote our friends at Heritage Foods, in order to preserve this amazing breed diversity “you have to eat ‘em to save ‘em!”

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Jon Fancey

Cheese Trek Travelogue: Morrow from Mount Gildead, Ohio

MorrowThe sixth stop on the Bi-Rite Cheese Trek take us to my home state of Ohio.  Many things come to mind when the Buckeye State is mentioned, and fine sheep’s milk cheeses are not on the list.  My mom was the first person to mention Kokoborrego Cheese to me – she noticed their stand at her local farmer’s market and asked me if I had ever heard of them.  I had not. Most cheese made in Ohio comes from large cheese plants or very small artisan producers, and none of it really makes its way here to California.

Kokoborrego Cheese is one part of Sippel Family Farm, a 77 acre organic farm in North Central Ohio.  Ben and Lisa Sippel grow organic vegetables and apples, and raise sheep on pasture.  Ben and Lisa purchased the farm in 2004 when they were only 23 years old, and they’ve been making cheese for a handful of years with the assistance of cheese maker Ben Baldwin.

Morrow2Ben mainly focuses on crafting rustic tomme-style cheeses with raw sheep’s milk – sturdy cheeses that can be matured and sold throughout the year.  Morrow is the youngest cheese he makes: a small cube of dense sheep’s milk cheese that’s been dusted with ash.  It develops a light, bloomy rind after a week; the flavors are fruity and sweet with notes of green garlic and grass.  Morrow is Kokoborrego’s most sought after seasonal cheese – they only make it for a couple of months during the summer.  Enjoy it with a glass of sparkling wine on a warm summer day.

Up next on our Cheese Trek is a visit to the ‘Catherdral of Comté’ to select a very special wheel of cheese that will be available in the Markets the first week of August!


Trac

Tequila & Mezcal: Your New Fun Friends

The popularity of tequilas and mezcals in San Francisco is amazing right now. With hot restaurants like Loló and La Urbana focusing their bar program on Mexico’s agave plants, it doesn’t seem to look like it’s slowing down anytime soon. For the novice though, mezcals and tequilas seem like the same spirit. This is true in that they are both made from the agave plant, but their production method and their varieties of agave are very different.

So, what are the differences between tequilas and mezcals? There are three major differences:

  1. Regionality: Tequila has to be made in the states of Jalisco, Nayarit, and Tampaulipas, with the majority of tequila production happening in Jalisco. Mezcal can be produced in most Mexican states, with Oaxaca being the main production center.
  2. Agave: Tequila can only be made with Agave Tequilana Weber, aka Blue Agave. Mezcal, however, can be made from over 30 different varieties, including Espadin and Blue Agave. Because of this, mezcals vary in flavor much more than tequilas do.
  3. Process: The agaves used in tequila are baked in steam ovens, or what is essentially an industrial pressure cooker. With mezcal, the agaves are roasted in an underground pit filled with wood and volcanic rocks, which gives mescal its distinct smoky flavor.

Because summer is synonymous with porch sitting and park picnic-ing, we asked our resident bartender, Kitty Galisia, to create two seasonal cocktails to celebrate these special spirits.  A seasoned bar veteran and mixologist, Kitty learned the art of mixology at the hands of local cocktail legends like Thad Vogler, Erik Adkins, and the team at NOPA (where Kitty tended bar for nearly a decade). Kitty’s cocktail philosophy is to make each drink its own, so that every sip takes you to a special time and place. Visit our recipes page to keep your summer weekend vibes rolling with these two agave-inspired cocktails, and picture yourself out with your friends,  sipping these fun, flirty drinks.

Bit of a bartender yourself? Check out our favorite tequilas and mezcals in the Markets:

MezcalVagoEnsamble*Mezcal Vago Ensamble en Barro Bi-Rite | $99.99*
Our first-ever exclusive mezcal made for us by Mezcal Vago in limited quantity! This is one-of-a-kind ensemblage (blend) made with three agave sub-varieties. They are roasted, fermented and distilled together in Olla de Barro (clay pots) to produce a wonderfully complex mezcal.

Del Maguey Chichicapa Mezcal | $74.99
One of the top villages in Oaxaca, Chichicapa shows beatutiful vegetal notes with flavors of green citrus rinds, pepper, and smoke.

Cimarón Reposado Tequila | $21.99
Single estate agave from one of Jalisco’s largest and renowned farmers means the best value in traditional tequila. Three to six months in white oak barrels takes the purity of blanco and splashes it with the nuance of age.

Tequila Ocho Blanco | $54.99
Tequila Ocho are vintage designated tequilas that come from a single estate with its own micro-climate, making these the most terroir-driven tequilas in the market. Pair this with Combier Triple Sec for a top shelf margarita.

 

 


Jon Fancey

Cheese Trek Travelogue: Schapenboerderij De Zeekraal from Terschelling, Holland

The fifth stop on the Bi-Rite Cheese Trek takes us Terschelling, one of the Frisian Islands off the northern coast of Holland.  I recently had the opportunity to spend a few days in Holland visiting farms and enjoying great cheese.  My hosts were Betty and Martin Koster, the owners of Amersterdam’s Fromagerie L’Amuse.  The Kosters select and mature Dutch cheeses which they either sell in their shops or export.  Their L’Amuse Signature Gouda is a mainstay at Bi-Rite, but their selection and passion goes beyond aged cow’s milk Gouda.  Betty was excited to take me to Terschelling to visit one of Holland’s most inspiring farmhouse sheep’s milk cheesemakers.

Terschelling1Our day started with a drive from Amsterdam to the port town of Harlingen, where we boarded a boat for a windy and rainy crossing of the Wadden Sea.  When we finally arrived at Terschelling, we were greeted by Jolanda and Gerben Bakker of Schapenboerderij De Zeekraal.  Gerben grew up on the island and now spends his days milking sheep and maintaining an organic farm; his wife, Jolanda, makes cheese and ice cream with the milk and runs a charming farm shop on their property.  We made it to the Baaker’s farm just in time to see their 200 Frisian sheep being milked for the evening and we also spent quite a bit of time with the new born lambs out in the pasture.  We enjoyed the couple’s cheeses for dinner and were treated to an off-road excursion to the eastern tip of the thin island to watch the sunset (at 10pm!).  After spending the night in yurts on the farm, we woke to the sounds of the animals and cups of coffee with fresh sheep’s milk.

TerschellingJolanda is one of only three cheesemakers on the island – and the only one using organic milk.  Her signature cheese is a small wheel of sheep’s milk gouda named for the island.  I first tried this cheese a few years ago and was intrigued by its rich flavors of nuts and caramel that accompanied its smooth & dense texture – the wheel I tasted from had been selected by the Kosters and matured to export to the United States.  I appreciate the cheese even more after visting the Baakers and tasting younger wheels of their cheese on their farm – Terschelling is a unique cheese that reflects the commitment this couple has to their animals and land.  I recommended enjoying the cheese on its own encounter all the complex flavors.  Betty Koster is also passionate about tea and encouraged me to enjoy her selections with Jasmine Tea – the pairing was unexpectedly wonderful.

The next destination on our Bi-Rite Cheese Trek is my home state of Ohio for a taste of an extra-special seasonal sheep’s milk delight!