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Archive for the ‘Who We Are’ Category


Kiko’s Food News, 9.18.14

As I pen this, we’re waiting for the results of Scotland’s independence referendum to come in…will Scottish people pay more for food if they go it alone? (Vice)

A top Texas official had a cow this week over Meatless Mondays, accusing school districts that have scaled back on serving meat of succumbing to a “carefully orchestrated campaign” to force Americans to become vegetarians: (Grist)

We Americans, along with the Japanese, Australians and Scandinavians, may bathe and refrigerate our chicken eggs, but here’s why many other cultures don’t: (NPR)

Any of you penny-pinching beer lovers wonder why craft brews are more expensive than mass produced? (Huffington Post)

Suppose you could upload a photo of your fast-food receipts from the past year, and get the corresponding amount of free, healthy, ready-to-prepare food in exchange? (USA Today)


Kiko’s Food News, 9.11.14

It’s exciting to see healthier food marketing to kids pursued not only by removing junk food ads and toys, but by creating fun, nutritious snack food aisles in the grocery store: (Professional Search for Knowledge)

Big Food skeptics like myself should consider this argument that mega food service providers could be ideally poised to healthify eating habits and offerings in the lunch room with their food scientists, testing panels, and clever marketing: (Forbes)

This report identifies the six “Best Places to Farm” in the US, based on an analysis of the profitability, financial efficiency and growth of farming in nearly 3,000 counties:  (Farm Futures)

The Chinese search-engine giant Baidu has rolled out a set of “smart chopsticks” that can detect oils containing unsanitary levels of contamination–useful in a country that has been rocked with scandals from toxic milk to glow-in-the-dark pork: (Wall Street Journal)

Starbucks is testing coconut milk in stores as alternatives to traditional dairy grow more popular; the chain isn’t testing almond milk due to nut allergy concerns: (Reuters)

Sometimes Food News can be as simple as one really satisfying, creamy-crunchy dish: if you’re a fan of avocado toast, check out all of the variations people are whipping up these days! (Brooklyn Based)


Kiko’s Food News, 9.5.14

San Francisco will be the first American city to offer a financial incentive for urban farming; starting this week, owners of empty lots could save thousands of dollars a year in property taxes in exchange for allowing their land to be farmed! (San Francisco Chronicle)

A Harvard study revealed that even though the overall quality of American diets has increased in the past decade, nutritional disparities between the rich and poor are growing; the study’s authors see sugar-sweetened bevvies as a key area where policy can play an even greater role: (The Atlantic)

Perdue, one of the country’s largest poultry producers, announced it will no longer use antibiotics in its hatcheries; the company has overhauled its cleaning procedures and made other tweaks to prevent infection, including experimenting with adding oregano, yucca and herbs to its feeds: (New York Times)

Almost one-third of food workers experience food insecurity at some time during the year; how ironic that one-sixth of our nation’s workforce work in the food-production chain, and so many can’t make enough to put healthy food on the table: (Huffington Post)

The food industry and agribusiness allies that oppose labeling of GMO foods spent $27.5 million in the first half of this year on lobbying that involved labeling–triple the amount they spent last year: (Environmental Working Group)

 


Kiko’s Food News, 8.29.14

Grandma, if you’re reading this, don’t give up your cottage cheese just yet: doctors know that people who eat too much salt should eat less of it, but may be guilty of running too far and too fast in the other direction given that Americans’ average consumption of 3.4 grams of sodium per day is on the low end of the “safe zone”: (New York Times)

It’s worth thinking about why people of lesser means may struggle to maintain a healthy weight, whether it’s due to the challenge of exercising in an unsafe neighborhood or emotional eating that can stem from the stress of making ends meet: (The Atlantic)

In Russian Food News, Putin’s government closed four McDonalds’ in Moscow last week, including one that is in some years the busiest McDonald’s in the world; the reason given by the country’s consumer protection agency was “numerous violations of the sanitary code”, but “Beeg Mak” lovers there know better: (New York Times)

Mexican authorities are restricting food marketing to children on television and in movie theaters, part of an attack plan against staggering obesity rates there; the restrictions follow recent taxes on sugary beverages and calorie-dense snacks: (Wall Street Journal)

Uber is trying its hand in the fast-food delivery industry with its new service “UberFRESH”, which it claims will deliver meals from local restaurants in under 10 minutes: (Forbes)


Kiko’s Food News, 8.22.14

Given the over $1 billion of food the US exported to Russia last year, Putin’s ban on American food imports is going to hit our poultry, pork and nut industries hard; food makers, however, claim they’ll be able to redistribute production to other global markets: (Washington Post)

The next international exposition, 2015 Expo Milan, will gather 140 countries to tackle the question of how to feed a future of 9 billion people without destroying the planet; America’s presence will focus on topics like GMOs and our obesity epidemic, fueled by national faves like lobster rolls and po’ boys: (Washington Post)

French scientists seem to have figured out how to make raw milk cheese safe, so cheesemakers at England’s legendary Neal’s Yard Dairy want to translate a French government cheese manual to unlock the secrets of how to use good bacteria to battle the bad: (NPR)

Whether it’s San Francisco’s Valencia or D.C.’s 14th NW, many urban streets beloved for independent business are losing ground to chain stores that all feel the same; somehow though, the “sleek epicurean village” one entrepreneur is hatching in Paris feels especially dramatic: (New York Times)


Kiko’s Food News, 8.7.14

A study showed that type 2 diabetes is more common in people who work shifts, likely because of the altered sleeping and eating patterns that shift work requires; eating late at night also makes one more likely to store calories as fat, leading to an increase risk of obesity: (Forbes)

The American Society of Nutrition’s Position Paper on Processed Foods has elicited discussion over the high percentage of nutrients in the average diet that come from processed foods, as well as what even qualifies a food as “processed”: (Huffington Post)

If you’ve ordered “eight olives in a ramekin”, or “an unconventional riff on brussels sprouts”, at a restaurant lately, you might be frequenting the typical trendy restaurants of our day: (Eater)

This author wants an end to the artisanal food that’s creeping into the ballpark, seeing no reason that a stadium experience should try to mimic a fine dining one: (USA Today)

Does anyone actually choose to eat honeydew? People rarely buy it for themselves, but often serve it to others (who most likely pick around it for the canteloupe and watermelon): (New York Times)

So, if you’re as enamored by melons’ summer sweetness as I am, how do you pick the best ones? Tips from one of my favorite bloggers include choosing watermelons with scars, and honeydews with rough tracks: (Chinese Grandma)


Kiko’s Food News, 7.24.14

“I don’t waste food, but everyone else does”–be honest, does this sound like you? A poll found that 63% of respondents are concerned about the amount of food wasted in the US, but only 1 in 3 thinks the amount of food wasted in their own household is a problem: (Sustainable America)

That’s worrisome, but I was impressed by the messaging and merchandising of French grocery chain Intermarché’s Inglorious fruits and veggies campaign, which shines a light on consumer waste: (Daily Mail)

Speaking of the French, even their restaurants are reheating pre-prepared food rather than cooking it from scratch these days; the government is trying to preserve what traditions it can by inventing a new logo for menus to flag food that’s been home made: (BBC)

Some innovative US farmers are selling gift cards; they’re easily swiped at farmer’s markets, and are another way (à la CSA) for farmers to get paid up front: (Conde Nast)

San Francisco’s “toy ordinance,” meant to improve the nutritional value of fast-food kids meals, instead has just led fast-food companies to charge for toys rather than move towards healthier meals: (Wall Street Journal)

Nestlé is bottling water straight from the heart of California’s drought, exporting a seriously limited resource–with no oversight: (Salon)


New! Get Your Bi-Rite Favorites Delivered with Instacart!

Instacart-Logo-ResizeIt is my pleasure to announce that beginning today, we are making a large selection of Bi-Rite Market products available for delivery in San Francisco through our new partner, Instacart. Many of you have spoken to me personally about your requests for delivery options, and we are thrilled to provide a flexible and convenient way to access the Bi-Rite foods you love.

PreparedFoods1We partnered with Instacart because, like us, they value personal connections and are committed to great service. And rest assured, we are always here to respond to any special requests, answer questions, provide recommendations, and share recipes.

We hope you enjoy the selection we have created for you in our Instacart store. You’ll find Bi-Rite classics and favorites, including:

  • IceCream1Bi-Rite Creamery Ice Cream
  • House-made Prepared Foods
  • Organic, Local & Farm-Direct Produce
  • Cheeses
  • Sustainable Meats & Seafood
  • Wine & Spirits
  • Groceries & SnacksMeat1
  • Deli Items
  • And much more!

Click here to visit Bi-Rite on Instacart and start shopping!

Open a new account on www.Instacart.com, and get free delivery on your first order of $35 or more.

We hope you enjoy your experience with the website, service, and food. As we fine-tune this new offering, we would love to hear your feedback. Email us at info@biritemarket.com, call (415) 241-9760 extension 0 and speak to a manager, or visit us in person. We look forward to seeing you.

Many thanks,

Sam and The Bi-Rite Family


Kiko’s Food News, 7.17.14

Through National Geo’s beautiful photography and Traci McMillan’s justice-oriented storytelling, this article reveals how the suburbs are one of many places where poverty is on the rise and a new face of hunger is being revealed: (National Geographic)

The CDC encourages workers to stay home if they’re sick, but that’s not an option for food industry workers, 70% of whom are low wage employees with no paid sick days; ironically, the worst food-borne illnesses, including a virus that sickens 20 million Americans each year, originate from contaminated food handled by sick workers: (CNN)

A comprehensive review of earlier studies found substantially higher levels of antioxidants and lower levels of pesticides in organic fruits, veggies and grains compared with conventionally grown produce; the findings don’t claim, however, that eating organic produce will lead to better health: (New York Times)

In areas where fresh produce is hard to come by and fast or packaged food is perceived as easier and cheaper than cooking ingredients, “groceryships” are a new attempt to provide families with an allowance to spend on plant-based groceries: (Civil Eats)

Now that we know sugar-laden juice isn’t the healthiest thirst quencher for kids to drink day in and day out, is it possible kids tea could become the new go-to? (Food Navigator)

And for the adults, rosé is pretty–but if you’re a little pinked-out, you might consider orange wine; it’s stocked with tannins from the time spent with grape skins, seeds and stems: (Modern Farmer)


Kiko’s Food News, 7.11.14

With an aging population of farmers, it’s clear that agriculture needs to attract more young people; luckily, ag jobs these days include permaculture design, communication technologies, forecasting, logistics, quality assurance, food prep, environmental science….lots of sexy fields for the youths! (Food Tank)

And here’s a step towards training them for the work: an emphasis on food issues will become an intensifying focus among all 10 University of California campuses, centered by the UC Global Food Initiative: (Sacramento Bee)

Testing is in progress on two treatments that desensitize patients who suffer from some of the most common allergens, including peanuts, milk, eggs, shellfish and wheat: (NBC)

Did you know the USDA has a “Let’s Glean!” toolkit, developed to assist groups with food recovery? More food-saving habits fall under the “gleaning” umbrella than you may realize: (Grist)

San Francisco’s food “swamps” (ever heard of those? They’re low-income neighborhoods with a lot of food but not much that is nutritious) are being made over by healthy corner store initiatives; the Southeast Food Access Working Group is one to which Bi-Rite has lent merchandising training: (Civil Eats)


Kiko’s Food News, 7.4.14

On this day celebrating our nation’s independence, I’d like to raise a glass to food freedoms for all:

Freedom from counterproductive legislation: California lawmakers voted to repeal a law requiring restaurant workers to wear gloves; this is a coup for workers who argue that hand washing is as effective, without the added cost or environmental harm from millions of discarded gloves: (Los Angeles Times)

Freedom from food waste: New York City’s school composting program has spread to 230 school buildings, with an ultimate goal of encompassing all 1,300-plus schools; eventually, the city will use “digesters” to turn garbage into usable gas: (New York Times)

Freedom to eat cereal any time we want! Around 20% of cereal eating happens outside of breakfast, but cereal companies are just beginning to market directly to adults who eat it at night or children who snack on it throughout the day: (Wall Street Journal)

Can’t say I feel like fireworks when I read these last two, though:

Danny Meyer, who set the gold standard for restaurant service at his Union Square Cafe, laments how his and other pioneering neighborhood restaurants are closing due to untenable rent escalations; only the condos and chain stores that likely replace them can absorb the high costs: (New York Times)

Toshiba (yes, the electronics conglomerate) says it will produce long-life vegetables in aseptic conditions at their Japanese factory, which was constructed to allow for much lower germs levels than typical for vegetables grown in soil; so much for benefitting from the nutrients and minerals of the land! (Bangkok Post)

 


Kiko’s Food News, 6.20.14

Amidst skyrocketing college fees, Starbucks is leading the way with education just like they did with health insurance decades ago; the company will provide a free online college education to thousands of its workers: (New York Times)

Uruguay might have beaten England in yesterday’s World Cup match, but we know their mojo didn’t come from their favorite snack: Brazilian officials confiscated 86 pounds of dulce de leche caramel spread from the team as it arrived to the Cup, since it was made with milk and therefore needed sanitary documentation: (BBC)

Looking for info on global meat consumption, GMO labeling policy, or obesity by state? There’s a map for that: (Vox)

Soul searches looking for a dramatic catalyst for inner growth are sipping ayahuasca tea, but experiences while under its influence “work” because, in addition to causing vomiting and diarrhea, it can be frightening and challenging to the psyche: (New York Times)

Diet fads come and go, but observers of nutrition and eating trends say the gluten free food regimen is likely to last longer and have more impact than others…or do “people just seem to like making eating difficult for themselves?”: (New York Times)