Home Posts tagged 'California Beef'

Posts Tagged ‘California Beef’


California Beef, “The Time is Now!”

Ask any cattle rancher about producing great beef and they will tell you that it starts with the grass.  As summer comes to a close we should take the time to celebrate California beef at its best, whether 100% grass-fed or grain finished the most pleasurable eating experience is going to come from cattle that got fat from grazing on lush pasture.

We are lucky enough to work with a number of top notch beef producers, but today we’re shining a spotlight on Richards Grass-fed Beef and Five Dot Ranch whose programs both exclusively feature California born and raised cattle.


Richards Grass-Fed Beef:

A fourth generation cattle ranch located along the Yuba River about 70 miles North East of Sacramento.  By only harvesting 10 head of cattle every two weeks, the Richards are committed to focusing on quality over quantity resulting in extremely limited availability of their amazing 100% grass-fed beef, all born and raised entirely on the ranch! The genetics of the cattle are mix of the well-known Black Angus and the Australian Murray Grey.  The Richards have found that the addition of the Murray Grey genetics resulted in animals that excel at converting lush pasture to tender, great tasting beef.


Five Dot Ranch:

The Swickard Family has been raising livestock for over seven generations.  In 2006 the family started Five Dot Ranch in Susanville, CA and today, the ranch is the largest public lands grazing permittee in California.  They raise Angus herds that are on pasture from the Napa Valley to the High Sierras grazing in wide-open spaces. Their cattle are 95% grass-fed and then finished on a short grain ration to achieve a consistently delicious product. They practice holistic land management, believe in low stress handling and exceptional quality care, which all result in excellent tasting premium quality beef. Bi-Rite was one of Five Dot Ranch’s very first customers and it has been since into a relationship we’re incredibly proud to have had ever since.


So come visit us in the markets, meet our butchers and take advantage of the opportunity to taste beef at its peak, or have it delivered to you via Instacart.

How to enjoy all this best of season California beef? Sicilian Meatballs with Fresh Basil Marinara from Eat Good Food.

These baseball-size meatballs are the mainstay of the market’s deli case. They’re flavorful and tender and stay good for several days after they’re made. If you have leftovers, they make an incredible meatball sandwich; just slice them up, reheat in the sauce, and put them in the middle of a good crusty roll. Then top with mozzarella or provolone if you have it!

Makes 6 large meatballs


  • ½ cup fresh breadcrumbs
  • ¼ cup whole milk
  • 1 large egg
  • ¾ cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano, more for sprinkling
  • ¼ cup ketchup
  • 2 tbsp chopped parsley
  • 1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano
  • 1 tbsp finely chopped fresh thyme
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 4 large cloves garlic, minced
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 ½ pounds ground beef
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 (28-ounce) can crushed tomatoes
  • Sugar, as needed
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil



Put a rack in the center of the oven and heat to 375F. Line a large rimmed baking pan with parchment or a nonstick liner and set aside.

Put the breadcrumbs and milk in a large mixing bowl, stir to blend, and set aside for 5 minutes. With your hands, squeeze and mash the breadcrumbs so that they make a smooth paste. Add the egg and whisk, then add the Parmigiano, ketchup and parsley, oregano, thyme, half the onion, half the garlic, 2 teaspoons salt, and ½ teaspoon pepper. Stir to blend.

With your hands, break the beef into small chunks and add to the bowl. Mix gently but thoroughly; overmixing with make the meatballs tough and dry. When all the ingredients are evenly combined, shape the mixture into 6 balls and arrange on the baking sheet.

Bake until an instant-read thermometer reads 165F at the center of a meatball, 40-45 minutes.

While the meatballs are baking, make the sauce. Heat the olive oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the remaining half onion and 1 teaspoon salt and increase the heat to medium-high. Stirring frequently, cook until translucent, about 3 minutes. Add the remaining half garlic and cook until aromatic, about 1 minute. Add the tomatoes, bring to a boil, and lower the heat to maintain a vigorous simmer. Stirring occasionally, cook until reduced to a thick sauce, 10 to 15 minutes. Taste the sauce and add a pinch or two of sugar if it seems too tangy, and season with more salt if necessary. Stir in the basil and keep warm until the meatballs come out of the oven.

Spoon the sauce generously over the meatballs and bake for another 5 to 10 minutes to blend the flavors. Garnish with a sprinkling of Parmigiano. #EatGoodFood!


Five Dot Ranch Prime Rib: My Favorite Holiday Meat

PrimeRibPhotoI love prime rib. Decadent, luscious, succulent, and juicy–it’s what I personally choose to eat on special occasions. And nothing is more special than a holiday meal you share with your family.

As Head Butcher and Meat Buyer, I always search out the best possible products that I can bring to our guests at Bi-Rite for their seasonal celebrations. This year, I selected prime rib from Five Dot Ranch, producers of some of the finest pasture-raised beef in California.

What makes prime rib from Five Dot so special is that they strike the perfect balance between grass feeding and grain finishing. Starting cattle on grass and pasture-raising allows the animals to develop a rich beef flavor and to grow at a natural pace. Grain finishing creates the ideal amount of marbling, for a buttery mouth feel and texture. It’s the best of both worlds, like Jay-Z and R. Kelly.

Five Dot is also committed to natural raising practices. Their beef is always 100% free of antibiotics and added hormones. They have been practicing low-stress handling and holistic management of their herd for almost fifteen years.

I recommended a serving size of roughly 1-1.5 lbs raw weight per person. And I am pleased to share this exceptional beef at a value price–normally $18.99 per pound, we’re offering it for the holiday season for just $15.99 per pound.

Prime rib is fairly straightforward to prepare. All that is required is some patience and a meat thermometer to cook it to perfection! Don’t forget to always check the temperature while cooking. I’ve provided some instructions below for cooking, carving, and making flavorful pan sauces.

I and the other Butchers at Bi-Rite are always here to answer your questions, prepare your meat to your specifications, and discuss preparation techniques. We look forward to sharing this wonderful prime rib with you and your guests! Happy Holidays!

How to Cook Prime Rib

1. The night before you plan to serve the roast, remove it from the wrapping and season liberally with salt. Allow the roast to air dry uncovered on a rack in the refrigerator overnight.

2. The next day, remove roast from refrigerator at least one hour, and up to three hours, before you plan to begin cooking. It is important for the roast to be near room temperature when it hits the oven in order to achieve even cooking.

3. Pre-heat oven to 250 degrees. Place roast, bone side down, on a rack in a roasting pan. Insert meat thermometer into center portion of roast, being careful not to touch the bone.

4. Cook slowly until internal temp on meat thermometer reaches 120 degrees for medium rare, 125 degrees for medium.

5. Remove roast from oven and tent loosely with foil. Reserve all pan juices from roasting pan and set aside to make a pan sauce. Wipe out roasting pan.

6. Increase oven temperature to 500 degrees/broil. When oven is very hot, uncover roast and return to oven. Cook until a crispy, brown crust has formed, 6-10 minutes.

7. Remove roast from oven and transfer to a large plate. Cover loosely with foil and allow to rest for 30-45 minutes.

How to Carve Prime Rib

Stand the roast upright, holding the bones with your free hand. Using a long thin-bladed carving knife, cut down between the bones and the meat, following the natural curvature as closely as possible. Once you reach the bottom, fold the bones out and cut through the last bit to remove them completely. Place the (now) boneless piece of meat on a cutting board, with the bone side down. Using your free hand, hold the roast steady and carve thin, even pieces. Carve only as many slices as you plan to eat right away; slice more as needed.

Don’t forget about the bones! There is lots of delicious meat in-between the bones that is great for eating or can be used in your pan sauce.

Making a Pan Sauce

Pan sauces are versatile, with endless flavor combinations.

1. After removing meat from pan, add more oil/fat (if necessary), onions, & garlic.

2. Deglaze the pan – add liquid and scrape up any browned bits from the bottom.

3. Bring liquid to a simmer and reduce by half of its volume.

4. Season any way you like:

Asian – broth, soy sauce, ginger, garlic, scallions, lime

Wine – onions, garlic, thyme, red wine, mushrooms

Caper – capers, shallots, white wine, lemon juice

…or just with salt & pepper!

5. Finish with a pad of butter (optional) and serve alongside meat.