Home Posts tagged 'goat cheese'

Posts Tagged ‘goat cheese’


Jon Fancey

Introducing the Bi-Rite Cheese Trek!

CheeseTrek_v2_web_banner

Welcome to the Bi-Rite Cheese Trek, a new way to taste cheese and explore the world. I’m your guide, Jon Fancey, the Bi-Rite Family of Businesses Cheese Buyer. I’m responsible for curating the cheese selection at our Markets; to do so, I spend some time every year traveling to discover new cheeses. I visit farms, meet cheese makers and exporters, attend cheese festivals, and explore the world’s finest cheese shops to find new offerings. By joining the Bi-Rite Cheese Trek, you’ll be able to join me on my travels and taste some of the best cheeses I’ve found. You can also engage with me and fellow Cheese Trekkers by exploring #cheeseyourownadventure on Instagram and Twitter, and following @biritesf. Stop by the Markets and talk to one of our mongers to join the Trek!

Bonde

Maker: Poitou-Chevre // La Mothe-Saint-Héray, France

The first stop on our cheese journey takes us to a small town in the Poitou-Charentes, a region in western France known for medieval towns and cognac. This region is south of Nantes and north of Bordeaux, with miles of Atlantic coastline. Agriculture is important to Poitou-Charentes – oyster farms, vineyards, and dairies are prevalent in the region. The first cheese on the Bi-Rite Cheese Trek is crafted by Poitou’s finest goat cheese maker.

Bonde d’Antan is a small round of goat cheese whose origins lie in the Middle Ages. When the Moors invaded the region in the 8th Century they brought livestock and food preservation techniques,

The goats of

The goats of Poitou

including goats and cheese making methods. Goats thrive on the green pastures of Poitou and small format goat cheeses are now a regional tradition. Poitou-Chevre was founded as a cooperative dairy in 1897 by goat farmers around the town of La Mothe-Saint-Héray. The cooperative produced classic, small-format goat cheeses for over 100 years before being turned over to the Rongeon Family. The Rongeons have been making cheese in Poitou for generations and are committed to sustaining the heritage of the cooperative by using the village’s goat milk to produce classic cheeses. The cheeses of Poitou-Chevre are the best cooperatively produced small format goat cheeses I’ve tasted on my travels.

The original sign

The original sign

‘Bonde’ translates to ‘stopper’ – the little cylinder of cheese is reminiscent of a wine barrel’s stopper. The cheese’s paste is dense and fudgey, and the flavors are slightly herbal, yet clean and lactic. I would enjoy Bonde d’Antan with a bottle of Rosé or crisp white wine from the Loire Valley – a neighboring region of Poitou-Charentes. This style of goat cheese also pairs very nicely with farmhouse ales from Belgium and Western France – we have several great examples available in the Markets.

The next stop on our journey will be a small village in Austria’s Bregenz Forest – the featured cheese from this village will debut in the Markets on May 19th, stay tuned and be sure to #cheeseyourownadventure!


Spring Cheeses! Celebrate the Season!

Laychee

In the world of cheese, spring is a very exciting time. It’s marked by a feeling of renewal and by the arrival on our local farms of green grass and lots and lots of baby animals! This makes it a very special time for young goat and sheep milk cheeses. The pastures are verdant and the kids (baby goats) and lambs that were born in March are running around the farm. With babies comes milk, and as cheese-lovers we benefit from this “freshening” in our own way: with an abundance of green grass and rich milk, we’re in fresh cheese heaven.

Bollie’s Mollies

 

 

We’re thrilled to welcome back with open arms a couple of cheeses that have been seasonally unavailable for the last few months. Lambs and kids are abundant at Pennyroyal Farmstead in Bonnville, and we’re celebrating the return of a couple of their cheeses. Early in the season, watch for Laychee, a beautiful fresh cheese with the silkiest of textures, made from a blend of goat’s milk and sheep’s milk and perfect for an array of applications. It’s delicate, pleasantly lactic and spreadable, great for brunch or as a base for a delicious crostini topped with preserves or sweet fresh fruit. Or you could just enjoy it with a simple drizzle of honey and a spoon!  Bollie’s Mollies, another delightful offering from Pennyroyal that’s aged for four weeks, is a denser, more toothsome option. It has a lovely light gray rind, thanks to penicillium album mold.

Kenne and Liwa

In other exciting news, Tomales Farmstead Creamery is milking their ewes for the first time! When we went for a visit in January, their herd manager was training the pregnant ewes to line up for milking in the milking parlor. Though we’ve had Tomales Farmstead’s Kenne on the counter for the last few months, it’s now being made with a blend of goat’s milk and the first of their sheep’s milk, which gives the cheese a richer, rounder finish with a hint of lanolin. Their farmstead-mixed milk is also being used to craft Liwa, a fresh, hand-ladled cheese that has a fudgy texture and more substance to it than some of our other fresh offerings. Cheeses from Tomales Farmstead Creamery are delivered directly to us from the farm each week.

Come by and ask for a taste of our favorite spring offerings! And stay tuned: come June, we’ll start to see some of the first aged, raw milk cheeses made this spring!